.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • By Patricia C. Held

  • By Patricia C Held Contributing writer

        Truck driver, lawyer, carpenter, engineer … these are a few of the career choices children consider when growing up.

  •     They say that, if you look far enough up your family tree, you will probably find somebody hanging. Jennifer Thomson, genealogical librarian at the Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library, has been researching her family tree. While she didn’t find anybody hanging, she did find something interesting in the foliage.

  •     What do you do if you nearly die? Bedford County native Shelly Hill took her second chance at life to publish a book of fine art photography.

        Hill, a 1991 Liberty High School graduate, was 34 when she came down with Fifth Disease. This disease is caused by parvovirus B19, a human virus. It is not the same virus that causes parvo in dogs. Dogs can’t catch parvovirus B19, nor can people catch it from dogs.

  •     When Diane Fanning was 9 years old, a man attempted to abduct her.

  •     Trying to keep a house cool in the summer and warm in the winter was a challenge 200 years ago, even if you happened to be Thomas Jefferson.

         Jefferson’s retreat, Poplar Forest, located in Forest shows how he did it, as best he could.
        “You have to start with the structure,” said Travis McDonald, Poplar Forest’s director of architectural restoration.

  •     For more than 30 years, adults, youth and children from all over Virginia have been converging on Eagle Eyrie Baptist Conference Center, between Big Island and Coleman Falls. 

  •     Gene Thomas, a Bedford native and 1971 Liberty High School grad, has loved art since his elementary school days.

        “I started drawing when I was in fourth grade,” he said.
        He was also fascinated with military aircraft from the time he was in elementary school. His drawings came from photographs in a book called “Fighting Aces in the Pacific.”

  •     Matt and Davannah Byers are hoping to spread the word.

        Their 8-year-old autistic son has a rare form of photosensitive epilepsy and they want to raise awareness about the condition.
        And maybe even help another family who is going through the same struggles they face on a daily basis.
        “We want to reach other people,” Matt said.

  •     Dr. William B. Robertson is a brilliant fundraiser. Camp Virginia Jaycee exists because of his fundraising prowess.

        He is also a builder of men. This past week he was in the area doing both.

    The camp
        Back in 1968, Dr. Robertson got the vision for building a camp for special needs people, along with the idea of how to raise money to build it. His idea was to by jars of apple jelly, wholesale, for 15 cents each and sell them for $1 each.