.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  •     Kayla Thelwell, who just turned 12 and lives in the Bronx, spent two weeks in Bedford courtesy of the Fresh Air Fund.

        The Fresh Air Fund allows children from low income communities in New York City to have country and small town experiences every summer.
        This is the third summer that Mike and Katy Shea, of Bedford, have hosted Kayla. She’s a very welcome house guest. The Sheas three children are grown and Katy notes that it’s nice to have a child around the house.

  •     Brigadier General Lapthe Flora recalls his first meeting with his platoon sergeant when, as a second lieutenant, he took command of of a platoon in Clifton Forge’s Company C. The sergeant was a Vietnam veteran.

  • The National D-Day Memorial Foundation has been accumulating a collection of D-Day related artifacts and documents for nearly 20 years. One of the most unusual is a vintage bottle of Calvados, a Norman apple brandy. The bottle belonged to Earl Draper.

  •     One of the area’s most talented pianists is only 11.    

        A sixth grader at Bedford Middle School, Dianne Fitzgerald performs at three local churches, including her home church, Big Island Baptist.
        She’s also performed at other venues. One of these was the Pearson Regional Cancer  Center, where she played to sooth patients as they received cancer therapy. Fitzgerald played classical music, hymns and “American classics.” She selected the music herself.

  • By Patricia C Held
    Contributing Writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com
     

  •     Jake Russell was 3 years old when he started having pain in his leg.

        His parents initially thought he might have injured his leg in a fall so they took  him to the doctor. An initial exam revealed Jake didn’t have an infection and that there wasn’t any break.
        More tests were run and soon they realized the diagnosis was much worse.
        Jake had cancer – specifically Ewing’s sarcoma.

  •     Larry Minnis and his son, Kevin, represent third and fourth generations of their family to work at the paper mill in Big Island.

        The first generation was Jessie Minnis, Larry’s grandfather. The second was Larry’s father, Marshall, who started in 1939. Larry’s uncle, J. W. Reynolds was the mill’s first black supervisor.
        Kevin noted that his maternal great-grandfather, Gilbert Spinner, also worked at the mill.

  •     Last year’s renovation of the bell tower on Bedford’s courthouse included repairs to the clock. Long before that, however, Edward Stanley worked on the clock and made sure it rang on the half-hour, along with tolling on the hour.

        Stanley always liked clocks and repaired them as a hobby when he was a child.

  • By April Cheek-Messier
    President
    National D-Day
    Memorial Foundation

        Seventy-five years ago, on February 20, 1941, a group of hale and hearty American boys kissed mothers and girlfriends goodbye, picked up their duffels, and filed in good order onto a train in Bedford, Virginia.
        None could know it, but they were departing for an unexpected rendezvous with history. They were Company A of the 116th Regiment, 29th Division—better known as the Bedford Boys.

  • Eva Arthur, who grew up near Ivy Creek, celebrated her 100th birthday at Carriage Hill last week.    

        Arthur grew up on a farm at the foot of Jackson Mountain. She got lots of exercise when she was young. She had no transportation and frequently walked up, down and around Jackson Mountain “running after cows.”
        The family didn’t raise cattle, but they had two Jersey cows that provided milk for their own use. Arthur helped milk the cows every morning.