Today's Features

  • By Patricia C Held Contributing writer

        Truck driver, lawyer, carpenter, engineer … these are a few of the career choices children consider when growing up.

  •     They say that, if you look far enough up your family tree, you will probably find somebody hanging. Jennifer Thomson, genealogical librarian at the Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library, has been researching her family tree. While she didn’t find anybody hanging, she did find something interesting in the foliage.

  •     What do you do if you nearly die? Bedford County native Shelly Hill took her second chance at life to publish a book of fine art photography.

        Hill, a 1991 Liberty High School graduate, was 34 when she came down with Fifth Disease. This disease is caused by parvovirus B19, a human virus. It is not the same virus that causes parvo in dogs. Dogs can’t catch parvovirus B19, nor can people catch it from dogs.

  • A shooting incident in the Thaxton area has ended with an 18-yearold in custody, without incident, according to the Bedford County Sheriff's Office.

    No citizens or law enforcement officers were injured during this event. One report stated the suspect had suffered a minor injury.

    The manhunt led to some roads being closed and schools going on lockdown in the Wheatland Road area of the county.

    The Sheriff's Office will release more information later this afternoon.

  •     Niyonsenga Pacifique was only 2 years old when the Rwandan genocide occurred in 1994. As many as one million Rwandans were killed and another two million became refugees.

  •     Local law enforcement and rescue agencies have a bright idea.
        And it’s shedding light on a subject they don’t want anyone to ignore.
        BULB – Buckle Up Live Better – is an effort of the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office and a coalition of community partners to encourage seat belt use in the county as an effort to save lives.

  •     A painting by Franz Beisser is being raffled to raise money for Big Otter Mill, a historic mill on Va. 122 near Bedford.

        Beisser, now retired, founded Bison Printing, located just west of Bedford. It’s a family-owned business that is now run by his sons.
        Art has long played a big role in his life. When he first got the business rolling, nearly 40 years ago, one of his marketing tools was to do pen-and-ink drawings of churches for the covers of their church bulletins which he printed.

  • ibrary is always an attractive place, but the Peaks & Pieces Quilt Guild really transforms it with the group’s annual quilt show. The colorful quilts are currently on display and the show will go on through next Tuesday.

        These quilts are works of art and you really need to see them up close to fully appreciate them. The intricate stitching in them is part of the artistry. All the quilts were made by Guild members.

  •     “We are going to take collective responsibility for this fiasco,” said Nancy Johnson, Friday evening, as she and Karen Hopkins gathered the cast of Little Town Players’ (LTP) 40th anniversary presentation.

        The local theater group was making its final preparations for the free show it presented Saturday night and Sunday afternoon. Johnson, Parkie Smith and Karen Hopkins planned and organized the entire show and it worked.

  •     Bower Center for the Arts officially reopened its doors to the Bedford community Thursday with a ribbon cutting that cut the bow on the $1 million renovation and expansion project.

        Dr. John Bower cut the ribbon, dedicating the building to his parents, Minnie and Mitch Bower. Dr. Bower and Edna Curry, the donors that made the Bower Expansion Project possible, attended Thursday’s opening and Dr. Bower recounted the history of his family’s journey that eventually landed  them in Bedford.