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Today's Features

  • The minimum age to be a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) is 21. Chelsea Clemons, who is 22, is the youngest CASA working out of the Bedford office.

        CASAs are appointed by the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court when a case comes before the court that involves children. The CASA’s job is to look out for the children’s interests and prepare a report for the judge. All CASAs are volunteers.

  • From the time Collage, Liberty High School’s literary magazine, fired back up four years ago it has garnered national attention.

        And it continues to do so.

  • Bedford County has the fourth largest horse population in Virginia, according to Richard Toms. That was part of the inspiration to start a new organization that actually began in January with seven people and now has grown to 65.

  • The Bedford County’s Sheriff’s Office has a long and storied history.  The county’s first sheriff, Joseph Ray, took office when Bedford County was first formed in 1754.

        Now it is in the process of compiling as much of that as possible.

  • For more than 100 years a hardware store has been located at 126 South Bridge Street in Centertown Bedford. For the past nine years Bill Mosley, and his wife Elizabeth Berry-Mosley, have been the owners there.

        That’s about to change, but they’re confident the store will remain viable and the history of that building’s use will continue.

  •     Georgia Pacific’s Big Island plant has installed a piece of equipment that both helps the environment and the plant’s bottom line.

        It’s called a recovery boiler and it allows the plant to recycle chemicals needed to turn wood chips into fiber. It also lets them use waste material as fuel.

  • When Hope Cupit’s daughter, Bendera, had her 13th birthday, she had something in mind other than presents.

        The Forest teen turned her birthday party into a fundraising event for a little girl named Hannah Johnson. Johnson, a student at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School, is fighting leukemia. The type of leukemia she has responds well to treatment, but it’s expensive. Her  family  has insurance, but their out-of-pocket expenses are cheap.

  • girls. The girls’ door was on the east side and the boys’ was on the west.

        Everybody walked to school in Bedford. Pizzati said that winters were much colder and snowier than they are now.

        “In the wintertime, I would get to school and my feet were frozen,” she recalled.

        The other children also got to school with cold feet. Pizzati said they would all go to a big heat register in the hall to get their feet warm.

  • Virginia Robertson has always worked hard and though she turned 102 years old this past Sunday she’s not yet ready to slow down.

        “I do everything I want to do,” Virginia said this week about remaining active. “I worked hard all my life — from the time I was knee-high to a duck.”