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Today's Features

  •     A book written by Mary Ellen Gallaher two years ago, called “Nobody’s Home,” sparked memories for a number of people who grew up in the Perrowville community in the 1930s and 1940s.

  • Ruby Laughon grew up on a tobacco farm that has been in her family since the end of the 19th century.

  •     The Artisans Center of Virginia (ACV), in partnership with Bedford County citizens, announced last week the initiation of the development of the Artisan Trail Network program in Bedford County.

  •     The Liberty Cowboy Church is going to War.

  •     One of these days it's likely Alexis Brown will be known as Dr. Brown.

     The 2013 Jefferson Forest High School (JFHS) graduate is headed off to the College of William and Mary, the second oldest university in the United States; she is enrolled in a pre-med program.

  •     Gary M. Seay, who now lives in the Westlake area, dropped out of high school to join the Army back in the late 1940s. He was looking for adventure, and a chance to make money.

  • After retiring as the president of an executive search firm, Dick Mendel was looking for a place to spend his retirement.

        He wanted an area with four seasons. His executive recruitment firm was based in Texas, but he is a Catskill Mountain boy, so he was looking for a green location. Mendel settled on Virginia, after some research and rented a house in Roanoke while he conducted a search.
        He settled on a house in Body Camp that needs a lot of work, but it’s a historic house.

  •     Kooper Jodoin just graduated from Staunton River High School last month, but he’s already working on recording his first musical album. Every track consists of music that he composed.

        “I write music in my head before I play,” Jodoin said.
        Jodoin describes his compositions as “compulsive.”
        “It’s kind of hard, melodic rock,” he said, going on to say that it’s hard rock, but not heavy metal.

  •     Back in 2001, Robert Miller, a local photographer, weighed a quarter of a ton.
        He had always been heavy, even as a teen, and he continued to gain weight. By the time he reached 548 pounds, many everyday activities had become difficult. Simply walking a short distance across a level floor would leave him breathing hard.
        Miller was  morbidly obese. The  medical  term means that he was at least three times his ideal weight. It also meant that his obesity would eventually kill him.

  •     The Jim Cameron Memorial Walk turned out to a great success for Lake Christian Ministries (LCM) when held for the first time last year.

        The event netted $27,000 with 40 teams, comprising 340 individuals worked to raise money for the organization’s work. According to Bart Matthies, co-chairman of the fundraising effort, this far exceeded expectations.