.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  •     Friday will be the last day for the Rwandan Hugs Thrift Store, located on North Bridge Street.

        “We are closing June 24,” Nancy Strachan, president of Rwandan Hugs, said.
        Hugs, which has been around since 2007, has operated the thrift store since August, 2013. The organization had a booth in the building for a year-and-a-half before that.

  • By April Cheek-Messier
    President
    National D-Day
    Memorial Foundation

        Seventy-five years ago, on February 20, 1941, a group of hale and hearty American boys kissed mothers and girlfriends goodbye, picked up their duffels, and filed in good order onto a train in Bedford, Virginia.
        None could know it, but they were departing for an unexpected rendezvous with history. They were Company A of the 116th Regiment, 29th Division—better known as the Bedford Boys.

  • Eva Arthur, who grew up near Ivy Creek, celebrated her 100th birthday at Carriage Hill last week.    

        Arthur grew up on a farm at the foot of Jackson Mountain. She got lots of exercise when she was young. She had no transportation and frequently walked up, down and around Jackson Mountain “running after cows.”
        The family didn’t raise cattle, but they had two Jersey cows that provided milk for their own use. Arthur helped milk the cows every morning.

  •     Milking a cow, sitting in the cockpit of an airplane with the pilot and collecting honey from a bee hive are some of the activities youngsters and parents enjoy during Field Trip Fun.

  •     December 12 turned out to be a strategic time for Bedford Baptist Church to hold its Pack-a-Truck event to benefit Bedford Christian Ministries.

  •     Because of kidney failure, Sue Wilken must have dialysis three times a week. It’s a very unpleasant process.

        “It’s painful to have those needles stuck in you,” she said.
        However, good came out of a bad situation. Before she went on dialysis, Wilken, who is five-feet, six-inches tall weighed 285 pounds.
        “I was eating a lot of fast foods,” she said. “I just kept putting on the weight.

  •     Yes, engineers can write and Ron Sisson, a retired General Electric engineer, proves that fact.

        Sisson has written a children’s book called Lost on Big Otter River. The book was written with an audience of readers ages 9 to 12 in mind.

  • Grace Ministries is the result of a vision that Josh Ball, and his wife, Kayla, have for serving the homeless in the Bedford area.

  •     Little Town Players (LTP) is getting ready to celebrate its 40th anniversary.
        Its first season was the 1976-1977 season, but it got started when the Vestry of St. John’s Episcopal Church sponsored a play called “Our Town.” The play was performed at Bedford Middle School’s auditorium and the play’s reception by the community led to the creation of LTP.

        The first season included three one-act plays.