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Today's Features

  • Naturally, when we face economically trying times, the social safety nets become ever more important.

        With people losing jobs and companies cutting back on hours and benefits, obtaining health care becomes more of a concern.  Oftentimes, illness or injury can be the straw that breaks a family’s financial back.

        That’s where places such as the Bedford Christian Free Clinic (BCFC) and the Free Clinic of Central Virginia (FCCV) can offer help.

  • Dee Duffy knows Stump, the winner of this year’s Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, well. She’s one of his breeders.

        The Montvale resident was in Indiana on Dec. 1, 1998, when Stump was born and she watched with tears in her eyes Feb. 10 as the Sussex Spaniel was named “Best in Show” at this year’s Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, outclassing some 2,500 other champion dogs for the title.

  • Tomorrow, Feb. 12 marks the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth. This year also marks the 150th anniversary of Darwin’s “Origin of the Species” in which he set forth his theory of evolution. To mark these dual anniversaries, Answers in Genesis is sponsoring two free national conferences to provide a biblical, science-based response to Darwin’s theory.

        The conferences are called “Answers for Darwin” and one will be held at Thomas Road Baptist Church, in Lynchburg, from Feb. 15 through 17.

  • Goode’s Country Kitchen closed its doors for the last time Sunday.

        The restaurant has stood on U. S. 460, on the eastbound lane just east of Bedford, since 1981 when Betty and Norris Goode acquired the shell of a building and turned it into Bedford County’s first country buffet. It finally closed, a victim of steeply rising food prices and the passage of time.

  • The world of professional music can be just as competitive as any sporting event.

        Just ask Michael Inge.

        The former Bedford resident makes a living creating music in Nashville, Tenn., and is now one of two finalists in the Duke’s Mayonnaise jingle contest.  And the fact is, his hometown can help him win that contest.

  • About 2 million people were on hand for President Barack Obama’s inauguration, but  only saw him on a TV screen. Cory Watkins, of Bedford, saw President Obama from about 20 feet away.

        Watkins, a 2006 Liberty High School graduate, is a member of the Hampton University Marching Force, the university’s marching band. The junior, majoring in business management and  minoring in Spanish, plays clarinet, the instrument he took up in sixth grade.

  • LaCarol Wynne wasn’t about to miss the inauguration of President Barack Obama last Tuesday so Monday afternoon she and two others set out from Bedford for Washington D.C.

        “It was so overwhelming,” she said of the event, which drew an estimated crowd of at close to 2 million people. “We didn’t get any sleep, but it was worth it.”

  •     Bedford Ride could use some more volunteer drivers, according to Ira Doom, the non-profit’s director.

        Bedford Ride, which first got rolling in the early autumn of 2001, provides non-emergency medical transportation for people who have trouble getting to medical appointments or to get to a pharmacy to get a prescription filled. Doom is one of the organization’s two paid employees. The rest are volunteers. The volunteer drivers use vehicles that are provided, and fueled, by Bedford Ride.

  • A local band that began in 1977 as the Love of God Singers has been reborn as L.O.G.O.S.

        According to Dan Snyder, of Forest, this name was chosen because band members wanted a name with initials that would spell something. L.O.G.O.S spells the Greek word that is translated “Word” in the first chapter of the Gospel of John: “In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God. (John 1:1)

  •     The Wharton Memorial Foundation and the Bedford Academy for the Arts ended the old year by becoming one. The merger took place in September.

        The Wharton Memorial Foundation was formally organized in 1997, according to Fred Duis, the foundation’s vice president and a founding member. Its roots go back to the desire to set up a public garden.