.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • Reynolds’ legacy lives on at Peoples

        Mike Reynolds first opened the doors of Peoples Furniture on the first business day in January, 1935 — in the depth of the Great Depression. Businesses had failed all over the place, but Peoples thrived.

        The business is still in the Reynolds family. Brian Reynolds, Mike’s grandson, and his wife, Kim, represent the second generation of the Reynolds family to run the store. Brian inherited the store after Mike died in 2012 at the age of 99.

  • It’s been peachy!

        Walter Gross has been growing peaches in Bedford County for 61 years.

        A. J. Gross and sons — Walter, who turns 81 this fall is one of the sons — planted its first block of peach trees in 1954, the year after Gross graduated from Bedford High School.
        A lot has changed over those years. Walter recalls that his senior class took a class trip to New York in 1953. The teens raised their own money and rented a Trailways bus for $500.

  • New antique shop opens in Bedford

        Rob and Linda Kuczmarski have been collecting antiques for 35 years.

        The hobby grew and the couple turned it into a business. At first, they sold from spaces in antique malls, but now they have their own shop. It’s called Needful Things Antiques and they opened their doors for the first time on March 1. The shop is located in Bedford at the corner of North Bridge Street and Depot Street.
        “We try to have a little bit of everything for everybody,” Linda said.

  • Vape shop opens on Lawyers Row

    Bedford has two vape shops in one town. Appalachian Vapors opened its doors on Lawyers Row in April.

        “Vaping allowed me to quit dipping and smoking,” commented Daniel Cyrlin, the shop’s owner.
        “I stopped dipping and smoking within two days,” he added. “I had no urge to dip or smoke.”

  • Dr. Fogsmith’s opens in Bedford

        Dr. Fogsmith’s Vaporium opened on the corner of West Main Street and North Bridge Street at the beginning of this month. It’s one of two vape shops to open in Bedford this month. Ron Hubert and his wife, Sandy, own and operate it.

        “We sat down and decided to start the business,” Hubert said.
        Hubert said he’s seen a lot of vape shops and he and his wife decided to go with an old-timey feel rather than the neon style most have. That’s where Dr. Fogsmith came from.

  • Cintas to expand operations in Bedford County

        Cintas Corporation in Bedford will invest $6 million in its facility to expand its operation.
        Bedford County’s Office of Economic Development announced the expansion this past week. The expansion to the Industrial Drive facility is expected to add 15 net new employees over the next three years.

  • Expansion leads to success at Fostek

        Fostek is a growing success making the same sort of foam rubber product that Rubatex once made in Bedford.

         In fact the plant, owned by Phil Foster, is in one of Rubatex’s former buildings. Foster bought the building in 2004, two years after Rubatex closed.
        “We just bought a piece of real estate with left over stuff,” Foster said. “It was just the carcass of a factory. It was start from scratch and rebuild.”

  • Going out of business

        There has been a hardware store at the corner of South Bridge Street and Washington Street for more than a century.

        The building was built in 1897 and it originally was called Burks-Ramsey Supply. It was a different business in many ways back then. The Bedford Hardware name came in the late 1940s. Burks-Ramsey sold the 1897 versions of many of the items Bedford Hardware sells today. But the store also sold plow parts and wagon wheels.

  • Bedford Yoga grows

        Business at Bedford Yoga Center has grown to the point that Helen Maxwell has expanded. Her previous studio had less than 300 square feet.

        “Now we have about 1,000,” she said.
        “We would get to a certain size in there and people would quit coming because they felt there was not enough space,” she commented.

  • Chamber honors local businesses

        Susan Martin, president of the Bedford Area Chamber of Commerce, noted that attendance at the Chamber’s annual business awards dinner has grown to the point that it’s getting hard to find a venue big enough to accommodate the event.

        Thursday night’s dinner filled the Boonsboro Country Club’s dining room and an overflow crowd in another room watched via live video link.