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Business

  • What some businesses are doing

    Two years after the end of the worst recession in decades, the economy remains tough. Here’s a look at how a number of Bedford County businesses have been able to navigate the rough waters and, in a number of cases, thrive.


    Still developing
        Real estate was an area that took a heavy hit when the real estate bubble burst a few years ago, putting a stop to a number of development projects. Locally, Downtown Moneta and Mayberry Hills developer George Aznavorian is bucking that trend.    

  • Local business leaders respond to questions about today's business outlook

        So how are area businesses coping with the new economy? The Bulletin posed several questions about that to some business leaders. Here are the responses we received from Dan Plattus of Bedford Main Street, Inc.; Susan Martin, president and CEO of the Bedford Area Chamber of Commerce; and Jim Shauberger, events manager, Smith Mountain Lake Regional Chamber of Commerce:

        Q: What would you say is the state of business in this area right now?

  • D. Reynolds to close its doors

        D. Reynolds has catered to the clothing needs of Bedford’s men from its South Bridge Street location for more than 60 years. But that’s about to come to an end.

        Carl Wells, who owns the store along with his wife, Dale, announced Monday that the store will close at the beginning of December.
        Wells bought the store in 1976 when he was still sheriff in Bedford County.

  • A good year for apples

        While some county agricultural operations got hammered by dry weather this summer, orchards have been an exception.

  • New physician joins Lake medical practice

        Smith Mountain Lake Family Practice now has a second doctor.

        Dr. Susan Funk joined the practice at the beginning of July. While she is a new face at SML Family Practice, she’s a familiar face in Bedford.  She practiced in a physicians group that included Dr. Allen Joslyn and Dr. Brian Buchanan for a number of years.
        “I came to Bedford in 1991,” she said.

  • Sears bringing Hometown Store to Downtown Moneta

        Plenty of excitement surrounded the announcement Thursday of a new store locating at the  Downtown Moneta development. Folks at the Lake were left guessing right up until developer George Aznavorian told the SML Chamber and other officials gathered for the unveiling.

        And they weren’t disappointed.
        The new 9,000 square foot building in Downtown Moneta will be a Sears Hometown Store.

  • Tech center opens in NL

        A new facility in New London promises to put Bedford County on the cutting edge of technology.

        The Center for Advanced Engineering and Research (CAER) held an official ribbon cutting, Thursday, although people were already at work in the facility.
        “We had people move in here before we even had the grand opening,” commented Bob Bailey, CAER’s executive director.

  • Sweet family business

    Rick De Simone, of Bedford, bought a sweet business back in 1970. That’s the year he purchased Bedford’s Dairy Queen. He’s owned the place ever since and, last week, Matt Dunham, vice president of Dairy Queen of Virginia, came to Bedford to honor him for 40 years in the business.    

        De Simone’s relationship with Dunham’s family also goes back four decades.
        “He signed a contract with my grandfather in 1971,” Dunham said.

  • Equine Association wants to bring facility to Bedford County

        The Bedford Equine Association’s dream is to set up an equine and agricultural complex in Bedford County. 

  • 309 Winery promises fun, food and wine

     Peggy Overstreet and Scott Taylor promise fun, food and wine at 309 Winery. The new business opened its doors at the end of April in the historic Wharton Cottage, located at 309 North Bridge Street.

        It’s an eclectic business: You can buy wine and beer there; you can buy Gross’ Orchard products; you can buy local art and locally made jewelry.
        “We are trying to do everything local,” Overstreet said,