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Business

  • At Island Creek Farm, they even make their own soil

        Troy and Holly Brown have had Island Creek Farm for 11 years.

        “We have farmed actively here for seven years,” Holly said.
        They are totally organic, and then some.
        “We don’t use any chemicals here,” she said. “We don’t even use organic chemicals. We believe in the importance of the health of the soil.”

  • New plan leads to growth

        D&L Cattle, in Goode, is run by a father and son team. The D is for David Arrington and the L is for Lynwood Arrington, David’s father.

        “We’ve raised cattle for several years,” said Lynwood Arrington.
        Previously they sold cattle to the market, but they began direct marketing to the public this year, in February, an idea that a cousin suggested. It sounded like a good idea and they began working in September, 2011, to put a plan in action.

  • Low spray makes sense

        Walter Gross, now 78, grew up in the orchard business.

  • Going chemical-free

        Ben Coleman, of Mountain Run Farm, decided to go chemical free after his son was born.
        “I didn’t feel good about sitting him in a field that I just fertilized,” he said. “We made a point never to bring chemicals down this driveway.”
        He has built the soil with manure and he said this has brought the soil to life.

  • Dry weather didn’t help farms; Fall Festival is this Saturday

        It’s been dry a dry summer, but it could have been worse. P. W. Morgan, a Huddleston farmer still ended up with a green corn maze and plenty of pumpkins in his pumpkin patch.

        Morgan, like many area farmers takes steps to bring the public out to the farm. He has a corn maze every year and a pumpkin patch, selling pumpkins directly to the public. People can either pick their own in the pumpkin patch, or buy them already picked.

  • Under new management... But familiar faces at Forks

        Forks Country Restaurant is now under new management — sort of.

        Rosella Bays and Teri Cheek have taken over from G. M. Bays, who started the restaurant on Aug. 28, 1984. However, if you are a regular customer, you know these two ladies. Rosella Bays is G. M. Bays’ wife and Teri Cheek is his daughter.
        “We’ve both been here for 27 years,” commented Cheek. “It’s still family owned.”    

  • New London Airport to hold 43rd Fly In

        The New London Airport will hold its 43rd Annual Down-Home Fly In on Sunday from 8 a.m.  until everybody gets tired and goes home. You can fly into the airport, or you can drive there by turning south onto Va. 811, off U. S. 460, opposite New London Academy.

        The day begins with breakfast, from 8 to 10 a.m. which, according to Tom Richardson, a pilot, will consist of pancakes, bacon, scrambled eggs, biscuits and “maybe grits.”
        Lunch starts at noon and features hamburgers and hot dogs.

  • Business community loses a landmark

        The Bedford business community lost a landmark.

        It wasn’t a building—it was a person. Thomas Edwin “Mike” Reynolds died on Aug. 12.

  • It's time to shut the doors

    By John Barnhart
    Staff Writer
    johnbarnhart@bedfordbulletin.com

        Shoprite’s 30-year run in Moneta has come to an end.
        Lewis Creasey, who owns the supermarket located on Va. 122 south of Moneta, said he will close the store, “when I sell out of merchandise.”
        A precise closing date hasn’t been set, but “I know I’ll be closed out of here on Sept. 8,” Creasey said.

  • Blue Ridge Bagels contest sparked interest in purchase

        The contest that featured Blue Ridge Bagels as the prize fell through due to an insufficient number of entries. Those who did enter, however, really wanted the restaurant and one of them, actually a husband and wife team, ended up buying it.

        Barry Kane teaches sixth grade science in Appomattox, so the restaurant will be an after school job for him. His wife, Cheryl, was an accountant for Lynchburg’s Department of Social Services. She will be the full-time manager.