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Business

  • Dry weather didn’t help farms; Fall Festival is this Saturday

        It’s been dry a dry summer, but it could have been worse. P. W. Morgan, a Huddleston farmer still ended up with a green corn maze and plenty of pumpkins in his pumpkin patch.

        Morgan, like many area farmers takes steps to bring the public out to the farm. He has a corn maze every year and a pumpkin patch, selling pumpkins directly to the public. People can either pick their own in the pumpkin patch, or buy them already picked.

  • Under new management... But familiar faces at Forks

        Forks Country Restaurant is now under new management — sort of.

        Rosella Bays and Teri Cheek have taken over from G. M. Bays, who started the restaurant on Aug. 28, 1984. However, if you are a regular customer, you know these two ladies. Rosella Bays is G. M. Bays’ wife and Teri Cheek is his daughter.
        “We’ve both been here for 27 years,” commented Cheek. “It’s still family owned.”    

  • New London Airport to hold 43rd Fly In

        The New London Airport will hold its 43rd Annual Down-Home Fly In on Sunday from 8 a.m.  until everybody gets tired and goes home. You can fly into the airport, or you can drive there by turning south onto Va. 811, off U. S. 460, opposite New London Academy.

        The day begins with breakfast, from 8 to 10 a.m. which, according to Tom Richardson, a pilot, will consist of pancakes, bacon, scrambled eggs, biscuits and “maybe grits.”
        Lunch starts at noon and features hamburgers and hot dogs.

  • Business community loses a landmark

        The Bedford business community lost a landmark.

        It wasn’t a building—it was a person. Thomas Edwin “Mike” Reynolds died on Aug. 12.

  • It's time to shut the doors

    By John Barnhart
    Staff Writer
    johnbarnhart@bedfordbulletin.com

        Shoprite’s 30-year run in Moneta has come to an end.
        Lewis Creasey, who owns the supermarket located on Va. 122 south of Moneta, said he will close the store, “when I sell out of merchandise.”
        A precise closing date hasn’t been set, but “I know I’ll be closed out of here on Sept. 8,” Creasey said.

  • Blue Ridge Bagels contest sparked interest in purchase

        The contest that featured Blue Ridge Bagels as the prize fell through due to an insufficient number of entries. Those who did enter, however, really wanted the restaurant and one of them, actually a husband and wife team, ended up buying it.

        Barry Kane teaches sixth grade science in Appomattox, so the restaurant will be an after school job for him. His wife, Cheryl, was an accountant for Lynchburg’s Department of Social Services. She will be the full-time manager.

  • 40 years and still going strong

    She’s 70, but she has no intention of retiring.

        Last week, on Aug. 1,  the owners of Bacon Enterprises, which owns the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant in Bedford, honored Dorothy Carter for 40 years with the company. It was exactly 40 years ago to the day that Carter and her first husband, the late Kennis King, were hired by Bacon to open the KFC restaurant in Bedford, serving as its managers.

  • Clam Digger’s Seafood expands with new multi-purpose room

    By Laura Enderson

    Intern Writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com

        Clam Digger’s Seafood on Bridge Street offers Bedford something unique. Fresh seafood and three different areas to enjoy, with a different feel to each one.
        “Each room in the place has its own personality,” owner Tina Guley said. “You get a wide variety of choices.”

  • National board member meets with Elks Home's residents

    ter spending a day last week at the Elks National Home in Bedford, Eric Mulholland, a member of the organization’s national board of directors held a meeting with residents there in the home’s dining room.
        “We have some pretty good news,” said Mulholland, just before expelling all media representatives from the room.
        So, what happened?

  • Forest Farmers Market continues to grow

    By Laura Enderson

    Intern Writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com

        When Dorothy McIntyre, Forest Farmers Market founder and market manager, realized Forest didn’t had a local market, she decided to take action. 
        McIntyre, along with her fellow founders, including Holly Brown of Island Creek Farm, worked with Scott Baker, Bedford County’s extension agent, and the Forest Library to create a market for Forest.