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Education

  • School board names new principals

        The Bedford County School Board appointed principals for Moneta Elementary and Staunton River Middle School during action at Thursday’s meeting.

        Melanie Simmons is the new principal at Moneta ES, taking over for Barbara Rezzonico, who has moved over to Bedford Science and Technology Center.

  • Board takes on bullying

        For Staunton River High School student Laura Ellis, the action taken against bullying by the Bedford County School Board Thursday is not the end, but rather just a beginning.
        “I will be pushing for a statewide bullying prevention program to be put in every high school,” she told the school board, prior to its vote on the policy last week.
        And, the 16-year-old Ellis said, she might just take her initiative nationwide.

  • Bower Center, YMCA team up for summer program

        The Bower Center has teamed up with the YMCA to provide art and dance for 169 children attending Y programs this summer. The children come in from Bedford, Forest and the Goodview areas.

        According to Sara Braaten, the Bower Center’s director, the 5- and 6-year-olds came in the morning and the older children, 8 through 12 years old, came in the afternoon.

  • New middle school likely to be near LHS

        The Bedford County School Board would like a new middle school in the Liberty Zone to be built either adjacent to the current Liberty High School, or at least nearby.

  • Getting children’s attention

        Nancy Kenton and The Great Haredini spent last week making appearances at all the Bedford area’s libraries.

        The Great Haredini is a big pink rabbit puppet. Nancy Kenton is the person behind Haredini’s act.

  • School board selects Jennifer Merritt to fill District 2 seat

        For the second time this year the Bedford County School Board had to fill a vacancy on the board. And, for the second time in its history, it chose to interview candidates in an open meeting.

        Six candidates applied to fill the District 2 school board seat vacated by David Vaden. School board members interviewed each candidate, asking each the same set of questions. Candidates waited their turn in a separate room so that none of them would have the advantage of hearing the questions in advance.

  • Bedford based organization promotes private colleges

        Tucked away in Bedford’s Centertown is an organization that promotes Virginia’s private colleges to the nation and the world. It’s called the Council of Independent Colleges of Virginia. It’s located in the building on Main Street that once housed the Bedford Democrat and currently is home to Robert Lambeth’s law practice. This is a good location for the organization’s office as Lambeth is it’s president. It’s also a good location because many of it’s members are in this region of Virginia.

  • School board questions behind-the-wheel training

        Behind-the-wheel training will continue to be available for students in Bedford County Public Schools, at least through this fall, but school officials are looking at the possibility of phasing out the program in the future.
        But several speakers, at last Thursday’s meeting of the Bedford County School Board, encouraged the board not to drop the program.

  • Six apply to fill vacant District 2 seat on Bedford County School Board

        Six District 2 residents hope to be appointed to fill the vacant Bedford County School Board seat left in that district when Dave Vaden resigned last month.
        The school board is scheduled to meet tonight, Wednesday, to interview the applicants, the second time this year they have had to go through this process. Earlier this year the board appointed Dr. John Hicks to fill the seat left vacant when Brad Whorley resigned from the board.

  • Health Camp gives students chance to see career up close

        A group of 15 girls spent last week learning what medical professionals do at Bedford Memorial Hospital’s annual Health Camp. They even got the chance to operate.

        The camp is designed for youth from 11 through 17. They spend a week at the hospital and are issued photo ID tags identical to the ones that hospital employees wear. All of the youth are interested in careers in health care, although one participant has a different kind of patient in mind.