• Top spellers!

        In the seventh and deciding round, she guessed.

        Through the first six rounds, Faith Peerman felt good about the words she had to spell – scrabble, macaroni, cauliflower, iguana, spherical and incorruptible. But in the seventh round, not so much.
        “I guessed,” she said with a smile.
        And she won.
        Peerman, a fifth grader at New London Academy is the 2016 Bedford County Spelling Bee champion.

  • Art students partner with Army Reserve Center on project

        A Liberty High School (LHS) art project is drawing attention to the new Army Reserve Center on U. S. 460. The students spent last Thursday afternoon painting some stacked hay bales.

        Melissa Friedwald, who teaches the Art 1, Adaptive Art and Digital Art classes oversaw the project, which was done by her third period Art 1 class.  Friedwald commented that she “usually doesn’t get to do the fun projects.”

  • Moneta Elementary plows new ground in personalized learning

    Moneta Elementary School has taken the lead in personalized learning for Bedford County Public Schools.

  • Two arrested for setting cars on fire

        Two Bedford County residents have been charged with lighting two cars on fire, in connection with separate incidents at Raintree Village Apartments.
        According to Bedford Police Chief Todd Foreman the police began investigating the car fires after receiving a call on Sept. 17 about a car on fire. Officers arrived to find the car fully involved in fire, he said.
        The Bedford Fire Department put the fire out.

  • LHS students plan dinner theatre

        Two teachers from Liberty High School have teamed up to provide a dinner and a show Sept. 26 at the Sedalia Center.
        Liberty High School Theatre will present “Stand Alone” in the dinner theatre performance, which will feature a collection of female monologues.
        The Theatre and Family and Consumer Science departments teamed together to put on the dinner theatre which will include the show, dinner, dessert and coffee.

  • Liberty High School marks half-a-century

        Liberty High School reached the half-century mark this year and its first graduating class, the class of 1965, is holding its 50th reunion next month.
        For members of this class, their senior year was the only year they attended Liberty and one group of them actually wear the class ring of a different high school. The students who came from New London Academy received their class rings during their junior year, and these were New London Academy rings.

  • Drivers warned to obey laws around stopped buses

        School starts on Aug. 17 and big yellow buses will be traveling the streets and roads of Bedford County on their mission to take students to and from school safely.

        The children’s safety not only depends on the bus driver’s skill and judgment, it also depends on people obeying state law when they see a school bus stopped with its red lights flashing and its stop sign extended.

  • Students will find more technology; some will have new principals

        Summer is almost history and history is almost ready to be taught once again.
        On Monday, Bedford County Public Schools will be back in session.
        “We have a lot of leadership changes,” Dr. Douglas Schuch.
        The most visible of these changes will come in school offices in the form of new principals and assistant principals.

  • Schools end fiscal year in the black

        The Bedford County School Board got some good news at its Thursday night meeting.
         According to Randy Hagler, the school division’s chief financial officer, the school division ended the last fiscal year $503,000 in the black. Hagler said this came about because the school division received $310,000 more in revenue than anticipated, while expenditures were $193,000 below what was budgeted. Hagler said the supervisors will be asked to re-appropriate this money to the school division’s maintenance fund.

  • Rocket science

        The Bedford Central Library’s last Wacky Wednesday, a part of the library’s summer reading program, soared to new heights last week. The children got to design, build and launch their own rockets.

        “We put a little science with our art today,” said Lauren Harper, the youth services librarian.