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Government

  • Town elects new council

        Several Town Council candidates offered their thoughts on the Nov. 4 election in phone interviews, following last Tuesday’s election.
        The election saw new four-year terms go to Bedford Mayor Robert Wandrei, Vice Mayor James Vest and Councilman Steve Rush. Two year terms—in a contested election for four seats among six candidates—were won by Tim Black, Robert Carson, Stacey Hailey and Beckham Stanley.

    Tim Black

  • GOP dominates local vote totals; Hurt, Goodlatte cruise to victories

        Democrat Senator Mark Warner will return to the Senate for another six years, but the election didn’t turn out the way pundits were calling it.
        In late October, Warner was supposed to beat Ed Gillespie by 10 percentage points. Instead, Warner barely survived, defeating Gillespie by 1,073,033 votes to 1,055,622 — less than 1 percent. Robert Sarvis, a libertarian got 53,053 votes, accounting for 2.43 percent.

  • Bedford voters go to the polls

        Turnout at county precincts was brisk, Tuesday.

        “We’ve had higher turnout than we thought we would,” said Barbara Gunter, the county registrar. By 1:09 p.m, 24 percent of the county’s registered voters had cast ballots.
        D. J. Ashwell, chief of the Blue Ridge Water Authority precinct, said they had 391 voters come through by 11:30 a.m. — more than he expected. At that point voter participation had already topped 20 percent at that precinct.

  • Bedford GOP censures three board members

        Bedford County’s Republican Committee voted to censure three of the county’s supervisors for voting to raise taxes this past spring. The censure resolution passed 35 to 25.
        The vote was taken after 20 minutes of debate with each side allocated 10 minutes and each speaker limited to two minutes.

  • County pitches in for fireworks display

        Bedford County will join the town of Bedford and the Moose Lodge to pay for a Fourth of July fireworks show on July 3. The measure was approved by the board of supervisors on a 6-1 vote Monday night, with District 2 Supervisor Curry Martin casting the lone dissenting vote.

  • Council candidates face off

        Bedford town residents had a chance last week to hear from the men who are seeking seats on Town Council next Tuesday.
        The candidate forum, sponsored by the Bedford Area Chamber of Commerce, gave each candidate five minutes to make an opening statement. That opening was followed by a question and answer period with questions submitted by the audience. All questions had to be submitted written on question cards, giving the chamber members who moderated the forum a chance to screen them.

  • Polls open at 6 a.m. Nov. 4

        Area voters head to the polls Tuesday with Bedford voters electing council members and everyone having the opportunity to vote in a congressional race and a US Senate race.
        Polls open at 6 a.m. and will remain open until 7 p.m.

  • Curbside recycling might return

        Curbside recycling may be on its way back in the town of Bedford.
        But how it will be implemented is yet to be determined.
        The Council Solid Waste Committee has recommended to the full Town Council that curbside recycling be brought back. Council has heard from numerous citizens upset that the town stopped the service earlier this year.

  • Event is chance to honor local law enforcement

    Thursday night was a night to honor local law enforcement and promote public safety at the Bedford Police Department’s annual Crime Prevention Day, held at the Bedford Farmer’s Market.

        The Bedford Fire Department showed up with a truck and various organizations set up informational booths. The police department gave people a chance to try driving the golf cart, or walk a straight line, with goggles that simulate how drinking too much can mess up your ability to do these simple tasks.

  • Trial run: New voting machine to be used

        Bedford County is getting ready to buy new voting machines, a move that will replace touch screen voting machines with an optically scanned paper ballot.