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Government

  • Two new faces join Town Council

        A special election, required as a result of Bedford's annexation of some territory as part of it's reversion deal with the county brought two new faces to Town Council.
        Tim Black was the number one vote getter in the six-way race for Council's four two-year seats. Black got 1,104 votes, representing 23 percent of the votes cast. Black is the son of former clerk of the circuit court Carol Black.

  • What should be done with Bedford Middle School?

    Have an idea about what should happen to Bedford Middle School once the new middle school is built in the Liberty attendance zone?

    You may be just the person Bedford Town Council is looking to help with that issue.

    Council is seeking area residents who would be interested in serving on an advisory committee to discuss ideas about what to do with BMS once it is vacated by Bedford County Public Schools. The advisory committee will be made up about seven members.

  • Johannessen wants to serve community

        “Several people asked me about it,” said Bruce Johannessen, explaining why he’s running for Bedford Town Council.
        He also believes a citizen owes his community some time and effort.
        “I think serving on Council is part of doing something for the community,” he said.
        This is Johannessen’s first bid for elective office, but he’s no stranger to government. He’s worked for the Virginia Employment Commission (VEC) for 43 years.

  • Bedford Moose Lodge seeks county's help for fireworks

        Andy Dooley, chairman of the Bedford Moose Lodge’s fireworks committee, would like some help with next year’s Fourth of July fireworks display. The Moose Lodge has sponsored the last two fireworks displays. Dooley appeared before the Board of Supervisors Monday night.
        Dooley said the Lodge had a meeting after this summer’s fireworks to decide if they were going to continue the displays.
        “We had an overwhelming ‘yes, we’d like to do it',” he said.

  • County appropriates budget

        Bedford County’s supervisors voted 6-0, with District 7 Supervisor Tammy Parker absent, to appropriate the county’s $89.38 million general fund budget for the fiscal year that starts on July 1. The budget’s capital improvement fund includes $800,000 designated for emergency apparatus. It also includes $2 million for water and sewer debt service.

  • National D-Day Memorial to Remain a Private Foundation

    The National D-Day Memorial Foundation is moving forward after news that the National Park Service will not be taking over the monument.  After four years of study, research, and conversations with numerous Park Service officials, the determination has been made that the Memorial does not meet NPS criteria.

  • County looks at new regs from EPA

        A major portion of a board of supervisors Monday evening work session was devoted to a presentation on storm water management.
        The state, which, in turn, is responding to an EPA mandate, is requiring all Virginia localities to have a storm water management ordinance in force by July 1 or face fines of up to $32,000 per day for failing to do so. Localities have until May 15 to adopt their ordinances, which must be approved by the state.

  • Boards discuss school options

        Within 60 days, the Bedford County School Board hopes to have a clear direction from the County Board of Supervisors as to how much the board will be willing to ante up to build a new secondary school in the Liberty Zone.
        Whether that school will be a middle school, high school or some hybrid between the two remains to be seen—and it all hinges on how much money the supervisors will be willing to borrow for the construction project.

  • Arrington delays resignation

    If you showed up at the board of supervisor’s Monday evening work session, you probably noticed that there was a person sitting in the District 5 seat who looks a lot like Steve Arrington; that’s because it was him.

        Arrington, who announced at the supervisors’ last regular meeting of 2013, that he plans on stepping down from the board of supervisors has delayed the effective date of that resignation. He said he is postponing the effective date because there are issues he wants to finish.

  • Council facing election

        When reversion took place last July, the newly-formed town of Bedford brought in 313 new residents as a result of boundary adjustments with Bedford County.
        That represented a 5.1 percent increase in population for the town. And it means, by breaking that 5 percent threshold, that all town council seats, just elected during a special election in May, will once again be up for election.
        That’s what the reversion rules spelled out.