.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Government

  • Hunting in town with firearms moves forward

     Bedford’s town council took another step toward allowing urban hunting with firearms last week.
        The impetus for this action is the inclusion into the town limits of territory that had been just outside the former city’s city limits. People in this area had always been able to hunt on their property with firearms. This isn’t legal under existing town ordinances.

  • Every resident counts! Just ask Town Council

        After winning their seats for Bedford Town Council in the special election held this past May, the top four vote-getters thought they wouldn’t have to run again for another four years while three were scheduled to have to run in the Nov. 2014 elections.
        You can throw those expectations out the window; all the council seats will be up for grabs in that election scheduled for just over a year from now.
        Why? Because the Census dictates it.

  • Museum funding restored

        The Bedford County Board of Supervisors voted, Monday night, to restore money cut from the Bedford Museum’s request when the current fiscal year’s budget was adopted in the spring and also agreed to purchase the local battered women’s shelter.

    Bedford Domestic Violence Services

  • Stokes let go as head of parks and rec

        Monday was Michael Stokes’ last day as the county’s director of parks and recreation.
        “Tuesday [Sept. 10] morning I was told by the county administrator that the board had decided to terminate me effective yesterday,” Stokes said in a Tuesday morning phone interview.

  • Council ready to pull the trigger

        Some new residents of the town of Bedford who were concerned they wouldn't be able to hunt on their property anymore, are a step closer to not having to worry about that by the time deer season opens.

  • Tax bills change for town residents

        Residents of the new town of Bedford will soon be receiving their first tax tickets from Bedford County and the town of Bedford, which will be a change from what they have experienced in the past.
        Real estate in the former city of Bedford was taxed on a fiscal year cycle with the tax year beginning July 1 and ending June 30.  County taxes are on a calendar year cycle, so town residents will receive a tax bill from both the county and the town covering the time period of July 1 – December 31, 2013. 

  • Montvale Park gets more money

        Montvale Park will get most of the money needed for its completion.
        According to Michael Stokes, Bedford County’s director of parks and recreation, $267,000 is needed to complete the park. He said there is currently $139,000 in the capital improvement plan for the park.

  • Sheriff defends license plate reader

        Bedford County Sheriff Mike Brown appeared before the board of supervisors, during a work session Monday to defend his office’s use of a license plate reader (LPR).
        It was no secret that Sheriff Brown was interested in a license plate reader. In an interview with the Bedford Bulletin, published in the March 3,  2011, edition, Sheriff Brown listed technology initiatives he wanted to implement in his final term in office, including one utilizing automatic license plate recognition.

  • Council considers firearms hunting in town

        Next Tuesday, Bedford Town Council will consider changing its firearms ordinance to allow some hunting with firearms in the town.
        The proposed ordinance amendment would allow for the discharge of firearms at private firearms ranges approved by the Bedford Police Department or for hunting with shotguns on parcels of at least 5 acres that are not within 100 yards of buildings, dwellings, streets, schools, ponds or public land or public places.

  • CASA overwhelmed by current caseload

        According to Angela Mayfield, the CASA advocate manager for the Bedford area, her office is being overwhelmed.

        CASA stands for Court Appointed Special Advocate. These are volunteers who are appointed by the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court judge when cases involving children come before the court. They go to the home, spend time with children and prepare a report that will help the judge determine what’s in the children’s best interest.