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Government

  • On the campaign trail: Cuccinelli visits Bedford

        “Sheriff Brown is a national leader in this area,” Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli said, during a campaign stop in Bedford. Cuccinelli was referring to Sheriff Mike Brown’s efforts to catch sexual predators who hunt children on the Internet.

  • Council to look at hunting, meeting time

        Bedford Town Council will likely be moving its starting time for Tuesday council meetings from 7 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. until the end of the year, following a request by Mayor Bob Wandrei.
        Wandrei made the request at last week’s meeting, stating that he is taking a class in Lynchburg to learn to speak French in preparation for a trip with the Bedford International Alliance (BIA) next summer. A group from the organization will be traveling to France in June 2014 to join in the celebration of the 70th anniversary of D-Day.

  • DCR makes its case for work on Ivy Lake Dam

        Back in 2008, Liberty University (LU) received Ivy Lake—and the Ivy Creek Dam that created the lake—as a gift from the developer who built the subdivision around it.

        Now, the Virginia Department of Conservation Resources (DCR) is telling the university that it must make a major improvement to the dam’s spillway. The estimated cost of the improvement, which includes “armoring” the spillway with concrete, is $3 million.

    LU and DCR

  • Kaine stops in New London for economic development visit

        United States Senator Tim Kaine took a tour of the Center for Advanced Research and Engineering (CAER) in New London, Friday morning.

  • PC looks at New London drag strip request

        A text amendment that will allow commercial outdoor entertainment in an agricultural zone is on its way to the supervisors. The amendment is tailored so that it will only apply to the New London Airport, which also doubles as a drag strip.

  • Are info meetings on the way out?

        Bedford County’s supervisors voted 6-0 Monday, with District 7 Supervisor Tammy Parker absent due to illness, to initiate changes to Article I of the county’s zoning ordinance.
        The main changes eliminate the requirement for developers to hold public informational meetings, which are held before public hearings and must be advertised, and the need to post signs on property that are subject to requests for rezoning, special use permits or variances.

  • Gardner elected chairman of ROCIC Board

        This group likes to share; and sharing gets results.
        Now a local law enforcement officer is leading the way.
        Major Ricky Gardner of the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office was elected 2013-2014 chairman of the Regional Organized Crime Information Center (ROCIC) Board of Directors at its recent annual Summer Training Conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

  • Fire, rescue requests get OK from board

        Two requests by Bedford County’s fire and rescue department dominated the Board of Supervisors’ discussions Monday night.
        One was a request by Jack Jones, the county’s chief of fire and rescue, for $80,000, to be transferred from the contingency fund for personal protection equipment for firefighters. According to Jones, the fire and rescue capital improvement plan (CIP) has had a line item for this equipment that has not been funded for four years.

  • Supervisors appoint new library board, discuss comp plan

        The Bedford County Board of Supervisors regular meeting, Monday night, consisted of a series of housekeeping measures related to Bedford's reversion to town status.
        Under the reversion agreement, Bedford County purchased Bedford Elementary School and the Bedford Central Library. It also acquired the former city's interest in the Bedford Welcome Center. The vote the supervisors took was to authorize the board's chairman to sign these deeds.

  • Planning Commission begins review of comprehensive plan

        Bedford County’s planning commission is in the process of conducting a regular state mandated review of the county’s comprehensive plan. State law requires each locality to have a comprehensive plan and review it every five years.