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Government

  • Taking care of farmers

        The Virginia General Assembly convenes today and the Virginia Farm Bureau has some issues it hopes will be considered.
        One involves funding for soil and water districts and the Agriculture Best Management Practices Cost-Share Program. According to Bill Nance, president of the Bedford County Farm Bureau, the two go together.

  • Wandrei elected Bedford mayor

    Bob Wandrei will serve as Bedford’s mayor as the city rushes toward its reversion to town status later this year.

        Wandrei was unanimously elected mayor by his fellow city council members during a reorganization meeting last Wednesday. Skip Tharp indicated last November he wouldn’t seek reappointment as mayor, though he will continue to serve on council.
        Council also elected James Vest as vice mayor.

  • City council prepares for reversion

        In a brief Tuesday night meeting last week, Bedford City Council approved several resolutions in preparation for reversion.

  • Supervisors focus on choice of new county administrator

        The search for a new Bedford County administrator should reach its conclusion early next year, approximately one year after former County Administrator Kathleen Guzi resigned.
        According to District 3 Supervisor Roger Cheek, a consultant hired by the county has presented the board with a list of 10 candidates, narrowed down from a list of 41 applicants. Cheek said that the supervisors will narrow it down further, then conduct interviews.

  • Judges approve reversion

        A three judge panel, consisting of Judge Pamela Baskerville, Judge Brett Geisler and Judge William Alexander, approved on Tuesday the reversion agreement between the city of Bedford and Bedford County.
        Now it’s official: the city is set to become a town July 1, 2013.
        The judges met in the Circuit Court courtroom; members of Bedford City Council attended. City Council had reconvened a meeting that it had continued last week.

  • Supervisors update Bedford County Code

    Fortune tellers will no longer be taxed by Bedford County, but those of you writing the county a bad check will face higher fees.
        Those and other changes were part of an effort Monday to update the Bedford County Code.
        A number of items needed updating, according to County Attorney Carl Boggess and the board of supervisors unanimously adopted those changes at their Monday night regular meeting.

  • Montgomery stepping down from BCSO

        Tom Montgomery, the bailiff in Bedford County General District Court, called it quits, Friday, retiring after 20 years with the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office.

        Montgomery originally joined the Sheriff’s Office as a road deputy. Prior to going to the courthouse, Montgomery served as part of the regional homicide squad, which worked on especially difficult murder cases. He became a bailiff just after the turn of the century.    

  • Tharp to step down

        Bedford Mayor Skip Tharp told City Council last week he will step down from his duties as mayor at the end of this year.

        "I've thoroughly enjoyed every bit of it," Tharp said of his service as mayor. But now he's ready to step aside and let someone else lead the way.

  • Lawhorne elected president of Virginia Litter Council

        D. W. Lawhorne, Bedford’s superintendent of public works, has been elected president of the Virginia Litter Council for Litter Prevention and Recycling for the coming year.
        Lawhorne said that the Council consists of representatives of 180 Virginia localities. It works with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to get grants to buy supplies for litter clean-up activities and information on recycling. Lawhorne was elected during the Council’s quarterly meeting on Nov. 14.

  • Fire department proposes eliminating tanker

        Bedford Fire Chief Brad Creasy came before Bedford County’s supervisors Monday with an equipment replacement proposal.