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Government

  • Flushed

        A decision by the Bedford Regional Water Authority’s (BRWA) board of directors last week put an end to a local developer’s plan for a public/private partnership to extend a sewer line to Moneta Elementary School.

  • Bedford Police Chief to retire

        Jimmy Carter was president and interest rates on home mortgages were at 21 percent.

        The late ‘70s weren’t a good time to be selling real estate, but that’s what James Day was doing back then. So he started applying for other jobs, including with the Roanoke Police Department.
        He got the job and what started out as an interim job—two or three years until the real estate market came back—became his career.

  • Citizens: Hire new tourism director

        Several people spoke Monday evening,  during the citizen comment period that precedes every board of supervisors meeting, urging the county leaders to act soon to hire a new tourism director.
        The job came open last month when the previous tourism director, Sergei Troubetzkoy, left to take a job with Lynchburg starting that city’s first tourism department.

  • He’s been a mentor to many at the BPD

        If you ever happened to be at the Bedford YMCA when Sgt. Charles Nelms of the Bedford Police Department was lifting weights, you knew why it was foolish for anybody to try to resist arrest when he hauled that person in. In his prime, Nelms bench pressed 365 pounds.

        Nelms officially retired on July 1 and the Police Department held a farewell dinner for him at Olde Liberty Station Monday. During the dinner, officers who worked with him and for him offered compliments and some humorous stories.

  • Town water rates go up

        People in Bedford will be seeing higher water and sewer bills. A new rate schedule, approved by the Bedford Regional Water Authority’s (BRWA) board of directors last week, will take effect on July 1.
        According to Brian Key, the rate structure depends on the volume of water used and the meter size.
        “Your average customer is going to have a $3 increase on water  and   a  $4  increase  on sewer,” Key said.

  • Sewer deal flushed?

    By John Barnhart
    and Tom Wilmoth
    Staff Writer
    news@bedfordbulletin.com

        A letter written by School Board Chairman Gary Hostutler to the Bedford Regional Water Authority (BRWA) may have created some confusion about the Moneta Elementary sewer project.
        But, according to Brian Key, executive director of the water authority, the letter isn’t the issue at all.

  • BRWA to draw more water from SML

        The Bedford Regional Water Authority (BRWA) needs to stick a bigger straw in Smith Mountain Lake.
        The new water treatment plant BRWA will build on the former Camp 24 site will be able to treat up to 6 million gallons of water a day, according to Brian Key, BRWA’s director. He said the current High Point plant draws up to 1 million gallons a day. This means BRWA will need a larger water intake pipe, bigger pumps and a larger pump house.

  • Supervisors ready to help pay for sewer line extension

        Bedford County’s supervisors may have decided last week to help fund an extension of sewer lines in Moneta.
        This would solve Moneta Elementary School’s failing septic system problem, although the proposal that District 5 Supervisor Steve Arrington brought up at the very end of last week’s meeting, just a little before midnight, would treat it as an economic development measure and funnel the funds though the Economic Development Authority (EDA) instead of transferring the money to the school board.    

  • County's Tourism Director leaving post here

        Bedford County Director of Tourism Sergei Troubetzkoy is leaving his position here to become the city of Lynchburg’s director of tourism.
        Lynchburg City Manager Kim Payne announced Tuesday that he had appointed Troubetzkoy to that position, effective July 2.

  • New feedlot setbacks passed by supervisors

        A joint public hearing between the Bedford County Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors packed the supervisors’ meeting chamber, Monday night.
        It wasn’t even standing room only. Every seat was taken, people lined three sides of the room while others stood in the hall because there was no room for them.