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Government

  • Council hears budget requests

        With budget discussions up and running, Bedford City Council heard last Tuesday from three groups asking for the city’s continued financial support of their organizations.
        The announcement was also made that the city had officially filed the required paperwork to the Virginia Commission on Local Government stating its case for approval of voluntary reversion of the city to a town.

  • Senate, House seek compromise

        Virginia, the state where so much of America’s history was made, has made history once again.
        “This is the first time in the history of Virginia when the Senate has not passed a budget,” commented Delegate Lacey Putney, chairman of the House of Delegates Appropriations Committee.
        Putney has seen a lot of Virginia history. He has held a seat in the House of Delegates for 50 years.

  • Budget legal notice for tax rates approved by supervisors

        Bedford County’s budget adoption process is still on schedule.
        Monday night, the supervisors voted to approve the legal notices for the budget and tax rates and a public hearing on April 9. The hearing will be held at the Bedford Science and Technology Center on Edmond Street in Bedford at 7 p.m.
        The advertised tax rates will be the same as the current rates. This means that, while the supervisors could still lower the rates, they will no longer be able to raise them above what they have advertised.

  • Reversion agreement goes to Commission on Local Government

        Six months after officially adopting a resolution to revert the city of Bedford to a town—and some four years after discussion about reversion began—the actual document for the process to be reviewed has been filed with the Virginia Commission on Local Government.
        The document was filed Tuesday and the Commission is expected to meet Monday to establish a timeline for review of the agreement, along with setting the times for presentations and public hearings on it. The Commission will also tour the area as part of its review.

  • EPA rules worry area farmers, municipalities

    EPA efforts to reduce the amount of sediment and phosphorus flowing into Chesapeake Bay could have a serious impact on farms and municipalities in the Chesapeake Bay area.

        The issue is the EPA’s  proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) regulations on the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which includes portions of Bedford County. TMDL is the maximum amount of a pollutant that a body of water can carry and still meet clean water standards.

  • Low turnout in primary costs taxpayers

        A Republican presidential primary that produced low voter turnout still cost local taxpayers.

        Only 4.99 percent of Bedford’s registered voters, and 6.72 percent of county registered voters, turned out to cast ballots in the primary in which Mitt Romney and Ron Paul were the only two candidates on the ballot. Both Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum failed to make Virginia’s ballot.
        The primary cost the city $4,000, according to City Registrar Randi Herrick.

  • Cell tower plan needs update

        Bedford County’s telecommunications tower strategic plan needs an update, according to George Condyles, president of The Atlantic Group. This company serves as the county’s technical consultant on telecommunications tower issues.
        The current plan was adopted in 2002. At that time cell phone companies were in the process of transitioning from analog transmissions to digital. Wireless service concentrated on voice with very little data.
        “There was no such thing as apps,” Condyles said.

  • BCSO seeks funds to allow inmates to serve on work details

        The Bedford County Sheriff’s Office is seeking funds to allow Blue Ridge Regional Jail inmates to form clean-up work details along highways in the county.

  • New ambulance takes to the road

        A career ambulance crew that has been using a borrowed ambulance, provided courtesy of the Montvale Rescue Squad, now has its own. According to Jack Jones, the county’s director of fire and rescue, the ambulance was purchased from money obtained from insurance billing, rather than tax money. This is the second county-owned ambulance put into service this year.

  • Harmony decision delayed

        Harmony, George Aznavorian’s latest planned development, encountered push-back from some citizens during a public hearing last week.
        All but 10 acres of the land where he proposes to build Harmony is in Bedford County and is currently zoned AR, an agricultural zone, and Aznavorian needs it rezoned to PD-1, a planned development zoning, in order to build the project.