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Government

  • Board looks at capital projects

        At a March 12 budget work session, the Bedford County Board of Supervisors decided what they would do with a $5 million cash balance from the current fiscal year.
        The supervisors chose to spend $290,000 of this to offset a state Virginia Retirement System mandate. Then, they directed $1.18 million to the county’s  capital  improvement plan, holding $3.53 million in reserve to meet needs that arise once Virginia has a state budget.

  • Clearing the way

    Ever wonder what that old tank that sat near the railroad crossing at Grove Street, in Bedford, was for?

        According to D. W. Lawhorne, the city’s director of public works, the abandoned building behind it used to be home to the city’s department of public works. The tank was salvaged from a railroad tank car half a century ago in order to serve as a holding tank for liquid asphalt to treat roads.

  • Harmony gets a Planning Commission thumbs up

        The Bedford County Planning Commission voted unanimously, Monday night, to approve a rezoning that will open the door to a planned development called Harmony.

  • John Douglass seeks Democrats' nod for 5th District race

        Two Democrats are seeking their party’s nod to challenge Congressman Robert Hurt for the 5th Congressional District seat in November. One of them, General John Douglass, made a stop in Bedford last week for a meet and greet.

        Douglass earned a commission in the United States Air Force at the University of Florida and served for 28 years, retiring as a brigadier general in 1992.

  • Peyton Williams seeks Democrats' nod in 5th District

        A retired Army colonel is one of two candidates seeking the Democratic Party’s nod to take on Congressman Robert Hurt in the fall.
        Peyton Williams was originally the sole candidate seeking the nomination before congressional district redistricting put Fauquier County into the 5th Congressional District which, in turn, brought in John Douglass, making it a contest.

  • Council hears budget requests

        With budget discussions up and running, Bedford City Council heard last Tuesday from three groups asking for the city’s continued financial support of their organizations.
        The announcement was also made that the city had officially filed the required paperwork to the Virginia Commission on Local Government stating its case for approval of voluntary reversion of the city to a town.

  • Senate, House seek compromise

        Virginia, the state where so much of America’s history was made, has made history once again.
        “This is the first time in the history of Virginia when the Senate has not passed a budget,” commented Delegate Lacey Putney, chairman of the House of Delegates Appropriations Committee.
        Putney has seen a lot of Virginia history. He has held a seat in the House of Delegates for 50 years.

  • Budget legal notice for tax rates approved by supervisors

        Bedford County’s budget adoption process is still on schedule.
        Monday night, the supervisors voted to approve the legal notices for the budget and tax rates and a public hearing on April 9. The hearing will be held at the Bedford Science and Technology Center on Edmond Street in Bedford at 7 p.m.
        The advertised tax rates will be the same as the current rates. This means that, while the supervisors could still lower the rates, they will no longer be able to raise them above what they have advertised.

  • Reversion agreement goes to Commission on Local Government

        Six months after officially adopting a resolution to revert the city of Bedford to a town—and some four years after discussion about reversion began—the actual document for the process to be reviewed has been filed with the Virginia Commission on Local Government.
        The document was filed Tuesday and the Commission is expected to meet Monday to establish a timeline for review of the agreement, along with setting the times for presentations and public hearings on it. The Commission will also tour the area as part of its review.

  • EPA rules worry area farmers, municipalities

    EPA efforts to reduce the amount of sediment and phosphorus flowing into Chesapeake Bay could have a serious impact on farms and municipalities in the Chesapeake Bay area.

        The issue is the EPA’s  proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) regulations on the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which includes portions of Bedford County. TMDL is the maximum amount of a pollutant that a body of water can carry and still meet clean water standards.