A plaque bearing the words “In God We Trust” has been placed in the Board of Supervisors’ meeting chamber. It’s right above the board chairman’s seat.

        “If it’s good enough for Congress, it’s good enough for us,” commented District 1 Supervisor Bill Thomasson, who spearheaded the effort to have the plaque made and mounted.

  • Bedford Main Street will apply for grant

        A unanimous vote by Bedford Town Council last week will allow Bedford Main Street to apply for a Downtown Investment Grant from the state Department of Housing and Community Development.

  • Council OKs electric cost adjustment

        Bedford’s town council adopted a new method of passing on power cost adjustments to its customers.
        According to Councilman Tim Black, the town’s electric department will go to a variable cost adjustment method which will smooth out power costs. A study on the town’s electric department recommended the change.
        Town Manager Charles Kolakowski said the adjustment factor will be done monthly and calculated over a rolling six-month period based on actual costs to provide electricity to customers.

  • County takes a step forward on broadband

        Bedford County moved a step closer to providing county-wide broadband coverage Monday night.
        The Bedford County Broadband Authority and the Board of Supervisors took action to lease a site in Montvale to Mid-Atlantic Broadband Com-munications Corporation for a tower which will help bring broadband Internet coverage to parts of the county that don’t have it available.
        The Broadband Author-ity consists of the members of the Board of Supervisors.

  • Water turned back on at Army Reserve Center

        Army reservists arriving at Bedford’s Army Reserve Center nearly spent a weekend making do without water from the Bedford Regional Water Authority.
        The Water Authority had disconnected the Reserve Center last week because of non-payment of its last bill. Water service was reconnected before the reservists arrived because Bedford Mayor Bob Wandrei personally paid the Reserve Center’s past due amount of $1,259.42.

  • Board sets limit for school, gym

        The board of supervisors authorized, Monday night, spending $38 million to build a new middle school in the Liberty attendance zone as well as a competitive gym for Liberty High School.

  • Students explore art in county program

        Bedford County’s Parks and Rec department held its first art camp last week.

        The day camp, held at the Forest Recreation Center, drew 22 children. This camp was for children ages 5 to 10. One for older children is being held this week.
        Jenn Fitzgerald, an elementary school art teacher from Campbell County, was the instructor.
        “I had worked with her previously,” said  Stuart  Saunders, the  program coordinator for Bedford County Parks and Rec.

  • Supervisors authorize controversial project

        The county supervisors voted 4-3, Monday night, to approve a special use permit for a commercial wedding venue in the Goode area.

        The commercial wedding venue will be on Glass Hill Road, a half-mile from its intersection with Otterville Road. Events will be held on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Outdoor music will end at 10 p.m., an hour before the county’s noise ordinance takes effect. Events will be limited to 200 people and a water truck will be used to control dust on the gravel road.

  • Dumpsters to be removed from town landfill

        Dumpsters will no longer be available for use at the Bedford Landfill off Orange Street beginning July 1.
        Residents will still be able to utilize the landfill by going through the scales during regular business hours.
        Bedford Town Manager Charles Kolakowski also said area residents may use the dumpster facilities operated by the county in the area – including at Falling Creek, Route 43 near Northside Supply and in Goode.

  • Town has its say

        Back when Lacey Putney was first elected to the House of Delegates, the winner of the Democratic Primary was also the winner of the November election. Putney was first elected by unseating the incumbent delegate, Charles Green, in a Democratic Party primary in 1961.
        Now, at least in Bedford County, the winner of the Republican primary is also the winner of the November election.