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Government

  • Voter cards are out; voter turnout may be low

        New voter cards have been sent out, according to Barbara Gunter, the county registrar.

  • Planning commission denies rezoning request for shooting range

    After three hours worth of public hearings and discussion, the Bedford County Planning Commission made one decision concerning a shooting range on Va. 811 (Thomas Jefferson Road) and postponed making a second one.

  • Incumbent faces challenge in District 6 supervisor race

    The race for the District 6 seat on the Bedford County Board of Supervisors is one of several contested elections in this area.


    Annie Pollard
        Annie Pollard, the incumbent, won  the  seat  in  2007  after the death of her husband, Bobby Pollard, who had previously held the seat. She is seeking her second term on the board of supervisors.

  • Newman voices support for Putney over Republican nominee

        Republicans have not run a candidate against Delegate Lacey Putney since the days when Putney was a Democrat, back in the 1960s. Putney, an independent, has caucused with the Republicans in the House of Delegates for many years.

        So, why are they running a candidate against him now? The process allowed it, Republican leaders state.

  • Fallout from the lawsuit continues

     

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    Fallout from the video and lawsuit surrounding the actions of a Bedford County Public Schools special education bus driver and aide continued this week.

    The Virginia Department of Education informed Bedford County Public Schools Thursday that the department will conduct a review of the division’s training procedures for special education bus drivers and bus aides.

  • Bedford County Board of Supervisors Commit to Land Transfer

    On a motion made by Supervisor Dale Wheeler on Tuesday night, the Bedford County Board of Supervisors voted in favor of granting land to the Bedford County Public Service Authority (“BCPSA”).  The Authority has requested the Board of Supervisors transfer 50 acres in and around where the Blue Ridge Regional Jail Authority formerly operated the Moneta Adult Detention Center (aka “Camp24”) to the BCPSA as a site for a potential regional water treatment plant.

     

  • Republican headquarters opens

        Bedford’s Republican Party headquarters is open for business on North Bridge Street in Bedford.  The site they chose is in the store front most recently occupied by Ranch Road. According to Nate Boyer, chairman of the Bedford Republican Committee, the site was chosen because its Centertown location gives them better exposure to foot traffic. This was especially important as they opened in time for Centerfest and this location placed them in the middle of the festival area. Boyer said that it also gives them space for larger events.

  • Few turn out for reversion meeting

        The turnout was less than what local officials had hoped for, but those attending last Thursday’s meeting on reversion in Bedford City Council Chambers had ample opportunity to get their questions answered.

        “The city is not in economic distress,” Bedford City Manager Charles Kolakowski said about Bedford’s decision to revert from a city to a town. “We’ve looked at this as a positive step for both parties.”

  • Board approves funding for additional teachers

        At its last meeting in August, the Bedford County School Board voted unanimously to amend the school division’s staffing standards to add an additional teacher to each school with less than 250 students. This will result in hiring seven additional teachers.

        In order to pay for that, the school board had to ask the board of supervisors to move $300,000 from the school maintenance category to the operations category to cover the cost. The supervisors unanimously approved that transfer at their regular meeting Monday night.

  • Lowry Post Office could be closed

        Patrons of the Lowry Post Office don’t believe that closing that historic facility will do much to help the United States Postal Service recover an $8 billion deficit its facing this year.

        And they want it left open.
        The Lowry Post Office has been operating at its current site since 1854. Fifteen residents who get their mail there attended a meeting last Thursday to find out more about what’s being proposed.