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Government

  • Majority of board appears to agree on cost of new school

        After a presentation by representatives of M. B. Kahn and Moseley architects, and considerable discussion, the county supervisors reached a consensus on a $44 million price tag for the new middle school during a 5 p.m joint work session with the school board.

  • Town electric rates may increase

        During a 5:30 p.m. work session, last week, Bedford Town Council discussed recommendations  that were part of a study on what the electric department charges customers.
        This followed a presentation by John Wagner, the department’s director, on the electric department’s capital needs. These include major upgrades to the Snowdon Hydroelectric Plant on the James River.
        Council is looking at possibly increasing the electric department’s customer charges, which will vary by rate groups.

  • Interim no more

        Carl Boggess and Patrick Skelley no longer have interim in front of their titles.

        Monday night, the supervisors emerged from a closed door session to name Boggess county administrator and Skelley as county attorney. Boggess had  been  serving  as   interim  county administrator since former county attorney Mark Reeter left last spring. Skelley moved to interim county attorney at that point.

  • Letter from school board chair irks Wandrei

        Bedford Town Council went over the town’s proposed budget for the 2016-2017 fiscal year prior to a public hearing, last week, at which nobody spoke.
        But a letter from the chairman of the Bedford County School Board brought a negative response from council members.

  • ‘Foul’ move? Board votes to spare dogs that kill poultry

        Dogs that kill poultry will now be treated differently under county code from dogs that kill other types of livestock after a 4-3 vote by the county supervisors Monday night.
        According to County Attorney Patrick Skelley, who presented the text amendments to the supervisors, the county code change will allow courts to impose something other than the death penalty on dogs that kill poultry.

  • High school tracks to get upgrade

        A request to appropriate $3 million held in reserve for construction of the new middle school drew discussion about what happened to the remaining $1.1 million of the money left over from the Jefferson Forest High School (JFHS) renovation.
        There was also discussion, and eventual approval, of a request for funding upgrades to the tracks at the county’s three high schools.

  • Transient occupancy tax delayed

        The increase in Bedford County’s transient occupancy tax won’t take effect until Jan. 1.

        The supervisors voted 6-0, Monday night, with District 4 Supervisor John Sharp absent, to delay the increase. The action was taken due to concern over the impact a July 1 effective date would have on contracts for summer rentals that had already been paid before the supervisors voted, last month, to raise the tax.

  • Transient occupancy tax delayed

        The increase in Bedford County’s transient occupancy tax won’t take effect until Jan. 1.

        The supervisors voted 6-0, Monday night, with District 4 Supervisor John Sharp absent, to delay the increase. The action was taken due to concern over the impact a July 1 effective date would have on contracts for summer rentals that had already been paid before the supervisors voted, last month, to raise the tax.

  • Nance, Babb honored for their work on Harris case

        Two Bedford County Commonwealth’s Attorney office employees, Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney Wes Nance and Investigator Gary Babb, were recently presented with 2016 Law Enforcement Public Service Awards by the United States Attorney’s Office Eastern District of Virginia for their work on the federal prosecution and conviction of a serial sextortionist of teenage girls.

  • Bedford Police join White House initiative for open data

        The Bedford Police Department is participating in an Open Data Initiative sponsored by the White House in an effort to help law enforcement be more transparent to the public.
        Bedford Police Chief Todd Foreman, Assistant Town Manager Bart Warner and IT specialist  Christie Crouch attended a one-day seminar last month in Washington D.C. at the White House as part of joining that initiative.