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Government

  • Fee plan hits a snag

        The supervisors who were looking at a flat fee to fund opening a new cell at the landfill, and firetruck purchases got some bad news from County Attorney Carl Boggess Monday evening.
        Boggess began by reminding the supervisors that Virginia is a Dillon Rule state. This means that localities do not have the authority to do something unless the Code of Virginia gives them the authority to do it.

  • County may raise taxes

        The budget Bedford County’s supervisors are developing may include a real estate tax increase.
        During a Monday night work session, Deputy County Administrator Frank Rogers described two measures that will close the $141,000 gap remaining in the county’s budget. One comes from savings on medical insurance.

  • Supervisors choose not to give school board direction within 60 days

        Bedford County’s supervisors decided, Monday night, to further postpone making a decision on what school construction option they will support in the Liberty attendance zone.
        The supervisors had been presented a series of school construction options at a joint meeting with the school board on Jan. 28. At that time, the supervisors asked for 60 days to make a decision. With the end of the 60 days approaching, Board Chairman John Sharp placed the issue to the supervisors for a decision.

  • Goodlatte, Hurt send letter to FERC about charges to Bedford

    Two area congressman have joined together to ask the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to look into what caused the town of Bedford’s energy costs to jump by $500,000 in January.
        In a letter to the FERC, Sixth District Congressman Bob Goodlatte and Fifth District Congressman Robert Hurt stated the town had raised concerns about the energy prices climbing in January because of congestion fees related to the transmission costs the town incurred. Typically the town would pay $60,000 a month for that but in January the cost was $560,000.

  • Supervisors offer a little more money for fire apparatus

        A little more money may become available for fire apparatus this year. During a Monday evening budget work session, the supervisors agreed to transfer $300,000, out of $413,563 in undesignated capital improvement funds, to fire apparatus, bringing the total in that fund to $800,000.
        “The most pressing one is emergency apparatus,” said Board Chairman John Sharp as the supervisors discussed what capital needs the money should be designated for.

  • Fralick says goodbye

        Frederic Fralick, who represented the District 4 on the county’s planning commission for 10 years, said goodbye in what he termed a “soliloquy” at a farewell dinner held at Olde Liberty Station last week.

        Fralick’s time on the planning commission ended when his term expired in February and District 4 Supervisor John Sharp chose not to reappoint him.
        “I wish you the best,” he said to the gathering.

  • Town's bill goes up by $500,000; will pass it on to customers

        January’s extreme cold temperatures tested the electric grid that transmits power to residents served by the town of Bedford electric department.
        And a bill that came in $500,000 over its normal $60,000 cost, is testing the patience of Bedford Town Council.
        It will also affect the pocketbooks of the town’s residents.

  • Safe Surfin’ works to provide ballistic vests to law enforcement officers

        Representatives of a dozen Virginia law enforcement agencies came to the Bedford County Sheriff’s office last week to receive ballistic vests from the Safe Surfin’ Foundation.

  • Opening new cell at landfill will cost $8M

    “I would really appreciate one budget session where we got all good news,” commented Board of Supervisors Chairman John Sharp.
        The bad news they got, Monday evening, is that the landfill will need to close the cell it is using and open a new one in 2018. It will cost an estimated $8 million, but the solid waste department has only accumulated $3.7 million in its capital fund for that purpose.
        How did that happen?

  • Amtrak won't stop here

        Though passenger rail service will be traveling through Bedford, it's not going to stop here. Anyone wanting to travel on the expanded Amtrak rail service will have to go to a new station in Roanoke or the existing Lynchburg stop to catch a ride.
        Government officials in Bedford and Bedford County had hoped to convince officials from the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT) to place a station in Bedford, but received a letter last week stating that won't happen.