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Government

  • Goodlatte, Hurt send letter to FERC about charges to Bedford

    Two area congressman have joined together to ask the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to look into what caused the town of Bedford’s energy costs to jump by $500,000 in January.
        In a letter to the FERC, Sixth District Congressman Bob Goodlatte and Fifth District Congressman Robert Hurt stated the town had raised concerns about the energy prices climbing in January because of congestion fees related to the transmission costs the town incurred. Typically the town would pay $60,000 a month for that but in January the cost was $560,000.

  • Supervisors offer a little more money for fire apparatus

        A little more money may become available for fire apparatus this year. During a Monday evening budget work session, the supervisors agreed to transfer $300,000, out of $413,563 in undesignated capital improvement funds, to fire apparatus, bringing the total in that fund to $800,000.
        “The most pressing one is emergency apparatus,” said Board Chairman John Sharp as the supervisors discussed what capital needs the money should be designated for.

  • Fralick says goodbye

        Frederic Fralick, who represented the District 4 on the county’s planning commission for 10 years, said goodbye in what he termed a “soliloquy” at a farewell dinner held at Olde Liberty Station last week.

        Fralick’s time on the planning commission ended when his term expired in February and District 4 Supervisor John Sharp chose not to reappoint him.
        “I wish you the best,” he said to the gathering.

  • Town's bill goes up by $500,000; will pass it on to customers

        January’s extreme cold temperatures tested the electric grid that transmits power to residents served by the town of Bedford electric department.
        And a bill that came in $500,000 over its normal $60,000 cost, is testing the patience of Bedford Town Council.
        It will also affect the pocketbooks of the town’s residents.

  • Safe Surfin’ works to provide ballistic vests to law enforcement officers

        Representatives of a dozen Virginia law enforcement agencies came to the Bedford County Sheriff’s office last week to receive ballistic vests from the Safe Surfin’ Foundation.

  • Opening new cell at landfill will cost $8M

    “I would really appreciate one budget session where we got all good news,” commented Board of Supervisors Chairman John Sharp.
        The bad news they got, Monday evening, is that the landfill will need to close the cell it is using and open a new one in 2018. It will cost an estimated $8 million, but the solid waste department has only accumulated $3.7 million in its capital fund for that purpose.
        How did that happen?

  • Amtrak won't stop here

        Though passenger rail service will be traveling through Bedford, it's not going to stop here. Anyone wanting to travel on the expanded Amtrak rail service will have to go to a new station in Roanoke or the existing Lynchburg stop to catch a ride.
        Government officials in Bedford and Bedford County had hoped to convince officials from the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT) to place a station in Bedford, but received a letter last week stating that won't happen.

  • Cash takes position with Roanoke Co.

        When Sheldon Cash first started working for Bedford County as its solid waste coordinator in 1999, he was asked to commit to three years. The “three years” will end this week, 15 years later.

        Cash will start work this coming Monday as Roanoke County’s assistant director of general services. This Roanoke County department handles solid waste, county buildings and fleet services.

  • PC recommends approval of special use permit for B&B

        A bed and breakfast and commercial feed lots dominated a planning commission meeting last week.
        The planning commission unanimously recommended a special use permit for a bed and breakfast that Bill and Anneliese Piatt requested. This permit will clear up a technical violation of the zoning ordinance.

  • Chairman questions abstentions

        The Feb. 10 Board of Supervisors regular meeting marks the third time recently that District 1 Supervisor Bill Thomasson has abstained on a vote.
        At that meeting Thomasson abstained on a vote to transfer 69 acres of the former Camp 24 site to the Bedford Regional Water Authority (BRWA) for a new water treatment plant.
        That vote comes after Thomasson abstained, last month, on a vote to advertise the public hearing for the land transfer.