.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Southern Flavoring celebrates 80 years

    In spite of a tight economy, one of Bedford’s oldest businesses is prospering.

        Southern Flavoring got its start in 1929 after a mine cave-in left William G. Claytor a paraplegic. Claytor had worked as a mine inspector.

  • Attempted capital murder charge

    While investigating a burglary at a barn on Homestead Road in Bedford County, Bedford County Sheriff’s investigator Sgt. Brian Neal testified at a preliminary hearing Monday in General District Court that he was approached by Jay Woodrow Creasy, who lived adjacent to the property, who notched an arrow in a bow and pointed it in his direction.

        “I don’t allow pigs on my farm,” Neal said he was told by Creasy, who then added, “now you’re going to die.”

  • Attorney: Woman ‘remorseful’ for faking diagnosis

    The Moneta woman accused of faking having terminal breast cancer, and receiving money from  fundraisers to help her, is remorseful for her actions, according to her lawyer, Assistant Public Defender Michael Lonchar.

        Ashley Barton Weeks, 27, waived her right Monday in Bedford County General District Court to a preliminary hearing on a felony charge of obtaining money by false pretense. The case will now go before a grand jury, likely to be heard in February.

  • A West Point trio

    Getting appointed to a service academy is the equivalent of a $250,000 scholarship, according to Susan Ranowsky of New London.

        For the Ranowsky family, it’s happened three times. Their daughter, Sarah, a senior at Jefferson Forest High School learned that she had been appointed to the West Point class of 2014. She will join her two brothers, Geoffrey “Geoff” and Josh who are already in their second year there.

  • D-Day Foundation moves

    The building at the corner of East Main Street and South Street that has housed the offices of the National D-Day Foundation for 13 years is now empty.

        The Foundation’s office is now at 106 East Main Street, the former site of the ABC store. The D-Day Foundation set up its resource center at that site six-and-a-half years ago, not long after the ABC store moved out.

  • Challenging year

    Delegate Lacey Putney, chairman of the House of Delegates Appropriations Committee expects 2010 to be an interesting year.

        “To say that it is going to be an interesting year is to say the greatest understatement since when Noah said, ‘It looks like rain,’” Putney commented.

  • A look back at 2009

    Barack Obama inauguration

       

        The new year began with the inauguration of a new president.

        Barack Obama became America’s first black president and local schools made arrangements so that students could watch him take the oath of office on TV.

  • Troops fund Iraqi baby’s gift of sight

    One-year-old Noor Hassam Oudah, known as "Baby Nourah," was born blind with congenital cataracts. The condition is reversible with surgery, but out of reach for her family here, as the city's hospitals lack the facilities and physicians to perform such a procedure.

  • A winter wonderland

    In case you hadn’t noticed, it’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas.

        A record snow this past weekend helped usher winter into the area and cool temperatures, coupled with as much as 18 inches of snow in some parts of Bedford County, are likely to mean a white Christmas Friday.

  • Lighting up Christmas

    Don Stinnette enjoys decorating for Christmas. And if he can help make someone else’s holiday a little brighter by doing it, that’s all the better.

        That’s what led him, and a couple of friends, to put up a 30-foot high Christmas light display in his back yard this year .

        “I enjoy Christmas so much,” Stinnette said. “Maybe somebody else can get some enjoyment out of (the display) too.”