.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Slowly fading away

    It was 64 years ago Friday that the Bedford Boys came ashore on a French beach code named "Omaha." As it does every year, the National D-Day Memorial held a ceremony to commemorate the amphibious landing.

    Friday was bright and blazing hot, a contrast to the overcast, cold, wet day when the men of the 29th infantry division went ashore in 1944. In spite of the bright weather, there was a somber aspect. Part of this is due to the fact that many of the young men who landed that day never came home. The other is that those who did are now slowly fading away.

  • Committee recommends changes to zoning ordinance

    A committee charged with looking at Bedford County's zoning ordinance language on religious assemblies held its final meeting last week.

    The committee consisted of District 2 Planning Commissioner Lynn Barnes, District 1 Planning Commissioner Rick Crockett, George Nester, director of community planning and several church representatives. The committee has recommended making a religious assembly a use by right in all zones, except for industrial zones. It would also be allowed in industrial zones, subject to a special use permit.

  • Liberty High School teacher wins top high school honor

    Teaching is a second career for Mark Day, who teaches AP European History and American History at Liberty High School (LHS). Day was named Bedford County's High School Teacher of the Year last week.

    Day came to Bedford County, 13 years ago, after a 24-year career in the Navy. He's a veteran of the first Persian Gulf War of 1991.

  • Uses of Red Barn discussed

    Area residents attending a meeting on the Red Barn, Monday, decided the simpler is better.

    The Red Barn is located adjacent to the old county nursing home building on Falling Creek Road. It was built in the 1930s and served the county poor house, which was still in operation there at the time. The building may be a Sears kit barn, although Elizabeth Gilboy, director of Virginia Tech's Community Design Assistance Center, said that researchers aren't positive. She said that they have a Sears catalog from that time that shows a barn with a floor plan just like it.

  • Cell towers get approval

    Monday night, the board of supervisors approved two 80-foot cell towers near Va. 24 for AT&T Mobility.

    The first cell tower, located between Chamblissburg and Stewartsville passed with no discussion. The planning commission had unanimously approved it in late April and nobody spoke at the public hearing that preceded the supervisors’ action.

    The second cell tower, located 11 miles west of the highway’s intersection with Va. 122 was different. When it went before the planning commission in April, the commission voted 4-3 to deny it.

  • Students have GREAT day at Liberty Lake Park

    Bedford area schools’ G.R.E.A.T. program ended the year with a special day last week to reward the students’ efforts during the year. The G.R.E.A.T. program encompasses lessons in gang and violence resistance, decision making, peer pressure, anger management and social skills.

  • Planning commission approves B&B, private road request

    The county planning commission unanimously recommended a bed and breakfast inn proposal at the Smith Mountain Lake Airport.

  • Bunker Hill rezoning approved

    Bedford County's planning commission and board of supervisors approved rezoning at a joint meeting last week that clears the way for the old Bunker Hill Plant to once again be used for industrial purposes.

  • Earnest granted bond in murder case

    Having been incarcerated since his arrest Feb. 27 for killing his estranged wife, Wesley Brian Earnest, 38, of Moneta was granted bond during a hearing Friday afternoon in Bedford County Circuit Court.

    As of Tuesday morning, the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s office said it had not been notified Earnest had yet posted that bond. While bond is not commonly granted in a first-degree murder case, it wasn’t unexpected by prosecutors because the case is based on circumstantial evidence.

  • Bedford Museum gets permanent director

    The Bedford Museum now has a permanent director.

    Although Melanie Stevens comes to the area from Indiana, she has Bedford County roots. Her father, Glenn Stevens, a Church of the Brethren pastor, was born and raised here. He came home some years ago.

    This doesn't mean that Doug Cooper, who has been managing the museum, is going anywhere. He still spends two days a week there. Cooper said that he originally agreed to manage the museum for a year, until the museum board could hire a permanent director.

    "The year turned into two somehow or another," Cooper commented.