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Local News

  • '75 abduction case in Maryland leads investigators to Bedford County

    The 1975 abduction and murder case of two sisters in Montgomery County, Maryland, has led investigators to the Taylor Mountain area of Bedford County.

    Investigators with the Montgomery County (MD) Police Department are “zeroing in” on who they believe is responsible for taking the two girls, Sheila and Katherine Lyon, from a popular suburban Washington D.C. shopping center in 1975.

  • Redistricting proposal for Body Camp students released

    Bedford County Public Schools has released a proposed redistricting plan for students in the Staunton River attendance zone affected by the closing of Body Camp Elementary for the 2015-2016 school year.

  • 2nd person of interest named in case of sisters' abduction

    Investigators have named a second person of interest in the abduction and slaying case of two sisters in 1975 in Montgomery County, Maryland, and a special grand jury is scheduled to convene Friday in Bedford County Circuit Court to help with the investigation.

    For the past several weeks the four-decade long investigation into the missing girls has been focused in the Taylor Mountain area of Bedford County. A search for the bodies of the two girls has been ongoing over the rough terrain of the mountain.

  • Man enters FES, apparently steals teacher's credit card

    Bedford County Public Schools officials are working to increase security at Forest Elementary School following reports of an intruder who entered the school Sept. 19.

    According to school officials, an African-American man, bald and apparently in his 20s, went to the school and requested to have lunch with a first grade student.

  • Foreman named new Bedford Police chief

    Todd Foreman has been appointed Chief of Police for the Town of Bedford.

    An 18 year veteran of the Bedford Police Department, Foreman has served in the office of Lieutenant since 2009. He is a graduate of Liberty University, where he is completing work on a Master of Science degree.

    Foreman is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy as well as the Professional Executive Leadership School sponsored by the University of Richmond. He succeeds Jim Day, who retired from the position after eight years.

  • Drug collection receptacle being utilized

        The drug collection receptacle now in place at the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office appears to be doing its job.
         The first week of its use appeared to be fruitful, yielding 7.45 pounds of pills.
        The two oldest prescriptions were from 1969 and 1963.
        There was a large number of liquid meds along with inhalers, ointments and even several Eppy Pens.  CVS/pharmacy provided the drug collection receptacle to the Sheriff’s Office.

  • Annual Festival of Trees is underway

        Local organizations have been busy decorating Christmas trees at the Welcome Center for the Center’s annual Festival of Trees. People can vote for their favorite tree by contributing $1 per vote. These voters are encouraged to vote early and vote often. This contest is a fundraiser and each tree has a designated local charity. The charities designated by the top three winning trees get the money raised by the contest.

  • Elks Home village

        The Elks National Home, now an English Meadows Senior Living Community, will hold an open house on Dec. 2 from 7-9 p.m. If you go, you’ll get a chance to tour the interior of the historic Home.

        “We are inviting the community to see the beauty of the indoors,” said Sharon Jones, the Home’s activities director. “It’s prettier than the outdoors.”

  • Sweet gratitude

        Dr. Ron Hendrickson, a dentist in Goode, offered children an offer they couldn’t refuse. At least their parents couldn’t refuse it.  He offered to buy Halloween candy for $1 per pound. One child took him up on the offer to the tune of four pounds.

        “It’s amazing how these kids kept coming in,” Dr. Hendricksen commented.

  • Museum says ‘thanks’ to its volunteers

        The Bedford Museum hosted a lunch, this month, to thank its many volunteers.

        According to Doug Cooper, the Museum’s manager, nearly 100 volunteers perform tasks ranging from construction, to archiving donated items to making genealogy presentations. Archiving is critical so that people know what the Museum has and where it is. Some of them come in frequently, on a weekly basis or multiple times a week.