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Local News

  • Dancing the Virginia Reel

        Avenel featured an event that would have been familiar to the Burwell family — sort of.

        Odds are couples gathered many times, back 160 years ago, to dance the Virginia Reel in Avenel’s parlor.
        Saturday night, a sizable crowd from Bedford gathered to dance this historic dance with Woody and Marcia McKenzie providing the music. This couple plays traditional music, along with pieces they wrote.

  • Drug collection unit provides safe disposal

        Residents in Bedford County now have a way to dispose of unwanted, unused or expired medications anytime they want.

        On Monday, the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office unveiled a drug collection receptacle that has been placed in the outer lobby of the front entrance to the Sheriff’s Office, located at 1345 Falling Creek Rd. in Bedford. The receptacle was obtained through a partnership with CVS Pharmacy and the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

  • Coyote lottery begins in county

        With a jackpot of $2,000 funded entirely by local businesses and organizations, the Bedford County Agricultural Economic Development Advisory Board is hoping to entice hunters and trappers to participate in its third annual Coyote Lottery aimed at managing the growing threat of the predators on county livestock.

  • Saluting our veterans

        Tuesday’s weather — warm and sunny — provided a perfect morning for the National D-Day Memorial’s observance of Veterans’ Day.
        The observance began at 11 a.m., the traditional time for Veterans’ Day ceremonies. That’s because Veteran’s Day originally began as Armistice Day. The armistice that ended the Great War  took effect on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

  • BCM: The cupboard is almost bare

        Bedford Christian Ministries, located on Washington Street, has been helping local people in tight circumstances for years. Now, according to Helen Fiaschetti, the non-profit’s director, the organization’s circumstances are getting tight.

        One of the ways BCM helps people is to pay electric bills.  Fiaschetti said the organization typically requires a client to provide a co-pay when they do this, but now higher co-pays are required because there is less money.

  • Harvey to speak at Memorial's Veterans Day program

        John C. Harvey, Jr., a retired U.S. Navy Admiral, who is now the Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs for the Commonwealth will be the keynote speaker for the National D-Day Memorial’s annual Veterans Day program on November 11. 
        Attendees will have the opportunity to hear from Admiral Harvey who will speak at the National D-Day Memorial on November 11 at 11 a.m. during a special ceremony honoring veterans for their service.  The event is open to the public.

  • Bedford Post Office to offer USMC Postal Cancellation
  • Bedford DVS gives out annual awards

        October was Domestic Violence Awareness Month and Bedford Domestic Violence Services ended the month with its annual walk from the courthouse to a small park on Bedford Avenue that has a stone bench in memory of Sherrie Conner, a local woman who was murdered, the result of domestic violence. The spot receives loving care by the Blue Ridge Garden Club.

  • Certificate remembers Air Force Officer

        Congressman Robert Hurt stopped in Bedford to present a certificate and pin, from the Department of Defense, to Stephen Titus. The certificate is in commemoration of the Vietnam War and honors Titus' father, Captain Terrence Richard Titus, who was killed in Vietnam.
        Captain Titus, an Air Force Officer was killed when his C-123 crashed into a mountain in Pleiku Province in South Vietnam on June 11, 1965. The C-123 was a twin-engine cargo plane noted for its ability to operate out of small, unimproved airfields.

  • Artisan Trail is up and running

    Bedford’s Artisan Trial is up and running. The trail consists of artisan studios that are open to the public and sell directly to the public and agribusinesses that sell directly to the public, or supply other trail sites. Galleries are also included.

        There are restaurants on the trail. According to Mitchell Bond, of Goose Creek Studio, the restaurants are locally owned — not a chain — and include characteristics such as being in an historic building, having live music or featuring cuisine that is traditional for this area.