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Local News

  • Hitting the right note

        Band was always Musician First Class Allison (Flores) Fletcher’s favorite class while in middle and high school.

        Now she’s a member of the United States Navy Band, the premier musical organization of the United States Navy.
        As a student at Jefferson Forest High school, MU1 Fletcher participated in concert band and marching band, and was a member of a student flute duo and a woodwind quartet.

  • Bedford parade is Saturday

        Bedford Main Street, Inc will be hosting the Bedford Christmas Parade this Saturday, Dec. 6 at 4 p.m.. The rain date is Sunday, Dec. 7.
        The theme for the parade this year is “A Christmas Story...in Bedford.”

  • It was a moving experience

    Rather than tearing down the house that used to belong to former Bedford County Sheriff Jack Cundiff, Clay Luck decided to move it.

        He and his father, Gibo Luck are developing Oakwood Villas and the house was formerly located on the development’s site.
        One factor in the decision is that his wife, Tara, wanted to preserve it.
        “I like history so much,” she said.
         “It was well built,” she added. “We hated to see it torn down.”

  • One year later, couple sees new home rise from the ashes

    Jamie and Kim Snell, along with their three shih tzus, Mocha, Java and Latte, were able to move into their new home on Longwood Avenue the week before Thanksgiving.

  • Shooting ruled justifiable; officers return to duty

    The officer-related shooting death of Richard Thomas Bergeron on Oct. 28 has been ruled as a justified shooting by Michael R. Doucette, the commonwealth's attorney in Lynchburg, who was serving as special prosecutor in the investigation.

    “I will not be seeking any criminal charges against them,” Doucette wrote in a letter to Circuit Court Judge James Updike. “In fact, in my opinion, they should be commended for the quick and decisive action they took which saved the life of Doris Bergeron.”

  • Drug collection receptacle being utilized

        The drug collection receptacle now in place at the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office appears to be doing its job.
         The first week of its use appeared to be fruitful, yielding 7.45 pounds of pills.
        The two oldest prescriptions were from 1969 and 1963.
        There was a large number of liquid meds along with inhalers, ointments and even several Eppy Pens.  CVS/pharmacy provided the drug collection receptacle to the Sheriff’s Office.

  • Annual Festival of Trees is underway

        Local organizations have been busy decorating Christmas trees at the Welcome Center for the Center’s annual Festival of Trees. People can vote for their favorite tree by contributing $1 per vote. These voters are encouraged to vote early and vote often. This contest is a fundraiser and each tree has a designated local charity. The charities designated by the top three winning trees get the money raised by the contest.

  • Elks Home village

        The Elks National Home, now an English Meadows Senior Living Community, will hold an open house on Dec. 2 from 7-9 p.m. If you go, you’ll get a chance to tour the interior of the historic Home.

        “We are inviting the community to see the beauty of the indoors,” said Sharon Jones, the Home’s activities director. “It’s prettier than the outdoors.”

  • Sweet gratitude

        Dr. Ron Hendrickson, a dentist in Goode, offered children an offer they couldn’t refuse. At least their parents couldn’t refuse it.  He offered to buy Halloween candy for $1 per pound. One child took him up on the offer to the tune of four pounds.

        “It’s amazing how these kids kept coming in,” Dr. Hendricksen commented.

  • Museum says ‘thanks’ to its volunteers

        The Bedford Museum hosted a lunch, this month, to thank its many volunteers.

        According to Doug Cooper, the Museum’s manager, nearly 100 volunteers perform tasks ranging from construction, to archiving donated items to making genealogy presentations. Archiving is critical so that people know what the Museum has and where it is. Some of them come in frequently, on a weekly basis or multiple times a week.