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Local News

  • How to live to be 100

        The Bedford County Department of Parks and Recreation hosted a presentation by Lynchburg College on aging. The title was “How to Live to Be 100.”

        According to Dr. Todd Olsen, a Lynchburg College professor, there are currently 79,682 centenarians in the United States and that number is expected to top 600,000 by the middle of the century.

  • Bedford Observatory opens doors to area sky watchers

    By Hannah Steele
    Bedford Middle School

        Why just merely look at the stars when, instead, you can see them at an observatory in Bedford?

  • Help Bedford try to win a fireworks display

        Erika Kuhfeldt of Bedford is hoping to win a fireworks display for the community this year.
        And she wants others to join in the effort.
         Kuhfeldt responded to a contest sponsored by the Destination America cable channel. Visitors to DestinationAmerica.com can enter their town in the contest to with a Fourth of July fireworks display. All you have to do is submit a short essay on “what makes your community worthy of a special celebration.”

  • More coyotes taken this year

        Bedford County’s coyote lottery grew this year.
        The 97 coyotes taken represent a slight increase over last year in spite of winter weather that created poor conditions for trapping and hunting. The number of sponsors providing prize money also grew, providing enough money to create two additional prizes.

  • A wild month for wild fires

        March is normally not a particularly bad month for wildfires, according to Bedford Fire Chief Brad Creasy, but this March has been different. Low humidity and strong winds on warm days created good conditions for fire.

        “We’ve been staying busy,” commented Creasy.

  • Eyes of Freedom

        A truck, called the Eyes of Freedom Truck, made a stop at the National D-Day Memorial, Friday. This truck commemorates a unit’s loss in the Iraq War — a Marine Reserve company that lost 26 men in 2005 in fighting in Al Anbar province — the type of loss in which Bedford can surely empathize.

  • New Rec Association feels growing pains

        For all of the benefits expected to arrive with the reversion of Bedford into a town, some negative aspects have come to fruition, as well.
        As part of the reversion agreement, what was formerly the City Parks and Recreation Department was to have fallen under the auspices of the Bedford County Parks and Recreation Department.

  • Deer kill up; so are the accidents

        No changes will be made in the town’s hunting regulations, following a successful season in which a few properties within the town’s boundaries qualified for hunting on that land.
        During a work session of the Public Safety Committee last Tuesday, Bedford Police Chief James Day said there weren’t any issues with the new hunting ordinance that took effect this hunting season. Six property owners took advantage of  the guidelines set up to allow for urban hunting.

  • Moneta rescue expanding crew hall

    Moneta Rescue Squad’s crew hall was just fine when it was originally built, but it finally reached the point of being marginally adequate.
        John Singer, captain of the Moneta Rescue Squad, notes one issue — the width of the ambulance bays — as an example. Ambulances were a lot smaller 40 years ago. Today ambulances have one inch to spare on each side when they pull out.
        Another issue is the lack of insulation. Singer said it’s a cinderblock building with no insulation at all.

  • Time to spruce up the Memorial

        The National D-Day Memorial could use a little help from its friends as it prepares to mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day this year.