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Today's News

  • Goodlatte, Hurt send letter to FERC about charges to Bedford

    Two area congressman have joined together to ask the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to look into what caused the town of Bedford’s energy costs to jump by $500,000 in January.
        In a letter to the FERC, Sixth District Congressman Bob Goodlatte and Fifth District Congressman Robert Hurt stated the town had raised concerns about the energy prices climbing in January because of congestion fees related to the transmission costs the town incurred. Typically the town would pay $60,000 a month for that but in January the cost was $560,000.

  • Ag conference, expo is Saturday

        Area farmers and those involved in agriculture will gather Saturday for Bedford’s first Regional Ag Conference and Expo.

        The event will be held at the Central Virginia Community College Bedford campus from 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday. It will feature a trade show, seminars, coyote lottery drawing and a panel discussion on the future of agriculture.

  • NY man guilty of computer solicitation

        A New York man who exposed himself on a web cam to investigators on multiple occasions is facing up to 210 years in prison following his conviction in Bedford County Circuit Court on Friday.
        Charles Welsey Olmstead, 39, entered no contest pleas to seven felony charges of computer solicitation at the plea hearing.

  • Otter River students meet NASA astronaut

        Christopher Cassidy didn’t grow up wanting to become an astronaut. But when he did make that decision, he put together quite a résumé.

  • School Board begins its budget talks: Dr. Schuch's proposal calls for additional $4.4 million from county

        School Superintendent Dr. Douglas Schuch presented his proposed $109 million budget to the Bedford County School Board last Thursday; this week board members start putting their own marks on the school budget request.

        The County Board of Supervisors will have the final say when it decides on its ultimate allocation of local funds for the school budget.

  • Safe Surfin’ works to provide ballistic vests to law enforcement officers

        Representatives of a dozen Virginia law enforcement agencies came to the Bedford County Sheriff’s office last week to receive ballistic vests from the Safe Surfin’ Foundation.

  • Town's bill goes up by $500,000; will pass it on to customers

        January’s extreme cold temperatures tested the electric grid that transmits power to residents served by the town of Bedford electric department.
        And a bill that came in $500,000 over its normal $60,000 cost, is testing the patience of Bedford Town Council.
        It will also affect the pocketbooks of the town’s residents.

  • Deer kill up; so are the accidents

        No changes will be made in the town’s hunting regulations, following a successful season in which a few properties within the town’s boundaries qualified for hunting on that land.
        During a work session of the Public Safety Committee last Tuesday, Bedford Police Chief James Day said there weren’t any issues with the new hunting ordinance that took effect this hunting season. Six property owners took advantage of  the guidelines set up to allow for urban hunting.

  • Winter storm warning in effect; VDOT crews get ready

    SALEM DISTRICT:  VDOT CREWS PREPARED FOR MORE

    WINTER WEATHER

    Drivers encouraged to monitor weather forecasts and plan ahead

    SALEM– The Virginia Department of Transportation’s Salem District is gearing up again to respond to anticipated winter weather in western Virginia.  VDOT has prepared equipment and alerted employees and contractors to be ready to mobilize.

  • Opening new cell at landfill will cost $8M

    “I would really appreciate one budget session where we got all good news,” commented Board of Supervisors Chairman John Sharp.
        The bad news they got, Monday evening, is that the landfill will need to close the cell it is using and open a new one in 2018. It will cost an estimated $8 million, but the solid waste department has only accumulated $3.7 million in its capital fund for that purpose.
        How did that happen?