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Today's News

  • Little Town Players celebrates 40th season

        Little Town Players (LTP) celebrated its birthday by announcing the list of plays it will perform for what will be its 40th season.

        “They said we’d never last,” Karen Hopkins commented during LTP’s Reveal party, held at their theater at the Elks Home. Hopkins is one of LTP’s founding members.

  • Bedford Yoga grows

        Business at Bedford Yoga Center has grown to the point that Helen Maxwell has expanded. Her previous studio had less than 300 square feet.

        “Now we have about 1,000,” she said.
        “We would get to a certain size in there and people would quit coming because they felt there was not enough space,” she commented.

  • HES teacher wins McGlothlin Award

        Just being named one of the six of the Blue Ridge region’s best teachers was quite an honor for Jalenda Settles.
        But last week, she was named the best.
        Settles, a fifth-grade teacher at Huddleston Elementary School was selected as one of two winners of the 2015 McGlothlin Awards for Teaching Excellence.
        With the award, she receives $25,000, some of which she will use for international travel to help expand her classroom teaching experience.

  • Couple guilty of welfare, medical assistance fraud

        Otis Lee Witcher and April Michelle Whitaker dug a very deep hole for themselves, a hole more than $100,000 deep, over an extended period of time.
        Tuesday morning, they each entered pleas in Bedford County Circuit Court to 20 charges of welfare fraud and medical assistance fraud. Witcher entered guilty pleas and Whitaker pleaded no contest. A no contest plea means that the defendant does not admit guilt but agrees that the prosecution has enough evidence for a conviction.

  • CASAs ready to serve

        A group of new CASAs took their oath in Bedford County’s Juvenile and Domestic Court last week.

        CASA stands for Court Appointed Special Advocate. These volunteers are appointed by the Juvenile and Domestic Relations court to provide the judge with a report that will help him make a decision about what is best for the children involved in a case that comes before him. Five of these new CASAs will come to the Bedford Office, according to Susan Shutt, Bedford’s advocate manager.

  • Film crew shoots in Bedford

        Filming for the feature length film God’s Compass passed through Bedford this week.

        On Monday driving scenes were being filmed as a truck pulling a trailer with a car and film crew was escorted by Bedford Police through various points in town.
        Additional scenes were scheduled to be shot in the Centertown area of Washington Street and South Street – Bedford Town Council was expected Tuesday night to give approval for road closings to allow for the scenes to be shot in late afternoon today.

  • Working together

        When the new Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) took their oath before Juvenile and Domestic Relations Judge Louis Harrison recently, two of them did so knowing they will work on cases as a couple.

        Jim and Joy Nobilini moved here last summer from Massachusetts — from the Boston area. Jim is the chief technical officer for Arrayworks, a company that develops accountability software. The nature of his job means he can live anywhere in the country.

  • Eagles remain unbeaten

        A good test of a team’s character comes when its back is against the wall.
        Well, the Staunton River baseball Eagles proved that they have character galore.
        And then some.
        After frittering away a five-run lead to Northside, the Eagles stormed back with a seven-run inning which was mostly fueled by moxie, grit and plate smarts.
        In the end, the Golden Eagles nearly hung a mercy rule defeat on their guests, instead settling for a 14-5 victory.

  • County tax rate to stay the same

        Bedford County’s tax rate will remain unchanged for the coming fiscal year.
        Monday night, after a public hearing, the supervisors voted unanimously to adopt the advertised tax rate. Under state law, the supervisors could not have set a rate higher than the one they advertised, but they could have gone lower.

  • DAR leads park clean-up project

        Reynolds Park is getting a clean-up, organized by the Peaks of Otter chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). The park is located on the east end of East Main Street and this will be the local DAR chapter’s first clean-up.

        “But we are hoping for more, and sunshine,” said Sharon Goff, the chairman of the local DAR’s conservation committee.