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Today's News

  • Sex ed material included in 5th grade hygiene packets

    The school division got an unpleasant surprise in the personal hygiene packets sent home with fifth graders at Otter River Elementary at the end of the school year, according to Ryan Edwards, Bedford County Public Schools' spokesman.

  • Chamber holds town hall meeting

    The Bedford Area Chamber of Commerce held it's first town hall meeting over lunch at Liberty Lake Park last week.

    Bedford Mayor Skip Tharp said that the number one issue for the city right now are talks with the county on the city's reversion to town status. He said that the talks are making positive progress and although residents of the town will get both a town and a county tax bill, he hopes that the combined total will be less than they now pay.

    "Nobody has any secret agendas," he said.

  • Camp helps youth understand history of World War II

    Making education fun is the National D-Day Memorial Foundation's approach to teaching youth about World War II.

    Every summer the Foundation holds a day camp, lasting three days, at the D-Day Memorial. Youth have an opportunity to don period attire, eat treats made from World War II recipe books and, at the end, share what they've learned with their parents. The camp can take up to 40 children and it filled up this year, with a waiting list, according to April Cheek, the Foundation's education director.

  • BCLP honors group's founders

    Bedford Citizens for Land Preservation (BCLP) honored two of its own with its third annual Barbar Hatcher award.

    The award was presented to Steve Stevick and Nancy Raine, two people who were at the grass roots of this grass roots organization.

    According to Annis McCabe, Raine and Jim Jones created a DVD that illustrated the need of preserving the county's farmland and forest.

  • The art of woodworking

    Termites would not receive a warm reception from the Central Virginia Woodworkers Guild, but anybody else interested in wood would be welcome.

    The guild, based in Lynchburg but with many Bedford area members, always has room for a few more folks interested in the craft. Members range from accomplished artisans to beginners. The organization, founded 10 years ago by Carl Miller, currently has 50 members.

    Todd Holt and James Jones represent the professional end of the spectrum, as does Roger Henderson.

  • School board won't pursue 4-day school week

    The Bedford County School Board briefly took a look at a four-day school week in order to cope with rising diesel costs. The board shelved the idea after concluding that it would create more problems than it would solve.

    Dr. James Blevins, superintendent of schools, told the board that savings are so soft that they could not count on them. He said that estimated savings would be less than $10,000 and contracts with school bus drivers and cafeteria workers would be an issue.

  • Providing for our men and women in uniform

    Last week, the House of Representatives passed, with my support, important legislation, the Supplemental Appropriations Bill, which continues to fund our military operations abroad and expands the education benefits for our returning service members, without raising taxes on the American people.

  • Drilling moratorium should be lifted

    Last week’s newsletter discussed the efforts by some of us on the Interior Subcommittee of the House appropriations Committee to get an amendment adopted to lift the moratorium on drilling for oil and natural gas on the outer continental shelf in at Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Gulf of Mexico. Since that newsletter, there have been some further developments.

  • Protect Smith Mountain Lake

    What is TLAC’s Protect Smith Mountain Lake Campaign?

    Everyone who enjoys Smith Mountain Lake can take measures to protect the lake. The Tri-County Lake Administrative Commission’s (TLAC) Awareness Campaign brings attention to measures we can all take to protect this valuable resource.

  • Food and water safety

    Today is the third edition in Virginia Cooperative Extension’s series.

    We’ve given you several tips about how to ready your family for emergencies and disasters. But maybe you still have questions about food? What type of water is safe to use? What ways can you cook when the power goes off? How long will your food stay fresh when the power goes off? We plan on answering these questions today.