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Today's News

  • A season of thanks

    The story of the first traditional Thanksgiving began over 380 years ago when a group of men and women fleeing persecution boarded a ship and set sail for freedom in the New World. The group, who would come to call themselves Pilgrims, battled treacherous weather conditions and bouts of sickness throughout the nine weeks they spent on the high seas.

  • Bill will help veterans

    On Veterans Day weekend, I had the privilege of participating in the dedication of the Danville-Pittsylvania County Veterans Memorial.

  • What it's really about

    As spam-mail goes, I've heard from more than my share of bankers and royalty in Africa waiting to send me money, if only I'll give them my bank account number or some other such nonsense. Spam has taught me about blue pills and others of varying colors. I've learned about all of these bank accounts that I started unknowingly that now need my personal information for "verification" purposes and I've learned how to purchase medicines from Canada.

  • Senate inquiry targets televangelists

    For many, many years Americans who hold dear their religious beliefs have been subjected to various and sundry appeals from television evangelists. Usually, it?s for money, and - given the rise of the religious right - it?s lately been for political support for some cause or candidate.

    It?s true that laws regarding the tax exempt status of churches prevent preachers from directly telling their subjects to vote for a certain candidate. But in recent years, ?Voter Guides,? produced by the Christian Coalition, have done the job just as effectively.

  • We'll get what we voted for

    Last week I read that students in Venezuela are carrying out campus protests against Hugo Chvez' effort to change the country's constitution.

  • Drivers on the roads need to take note and move over or slow down

    The holiday weekend means more travelers on Virginia roads, more travelers mean more vehicles and more vehicles mean the possibility for more accidents.

    With thousands taking to the roads this weekend, and throughout the holiday season, the Virginia State Police have announced a new public awareness campaign to remind Virginians of the importance of the "Move Over" law.

    It's a message worth taking time to consider.

  • Tree lighting will kick off events

    Even as the Thanksgiving turkeys were thawing out to go in the oven, Bedford was being prepared this week for the Christmas season.

    Lights and Christmas decorations went up around the Centertown area and final touches were being made on the light displays at Liberty Lake Park. Those lights are scheduled to be turned on this Friday

    On Saturday, Santa's workshop cruised down Main Street en route to its Centertown Park location, where his North Pole satellite station will be set up through this holiday season.

    Events were also announced for Centertown activities.

  • County takes up slack for museum funding

    Bedford County's Board of Supervisors voted Wednesday night to increase its funding for the Bedford City/County Museum by $20,000.

    The boost, which came from the contingency fund, came after the city of Bedford cut its funding for the museum by $20,000. This leaves the city's funding at $7,500 and boosts the county's funding to $50,000 this year.

  • Health worker gives advice on dealing with MRSA

    Melisa Hobbs was one of a number of parents who came to Staunton High School the morning of Oct. 16.

    Hobbs, however, wasn't there because of fears of MRSA. She came to pick up her daughter to take her for her driver's license test. Hobbs wasn't frightened by the MRSA story because these microbes are a part of her professional specialty. A registered nurse, she's the infection control coordinator at Bedford Memorial Hospital.

    "Staphylococcus Aureus is a normal bacteria on most people's skin and nose," she said. " We carry it around with us."

  • Susie Gibson reunion

    Last week, Bedford Mayor Skip Tharp signed a proclamation honoring the sixth all-class reunion of Susie G. Gibson High School.

    Now the Bedford Science and Technology Center (BSTC), Susie G. Gibson High School was built in 1954 as the Bedford Area's segregated black high school. It graduated its first class in 1955 and its last in 1970. It produced a total of 852 graduates during its 16 years.

    "We always give credit to our only principal, John I. Jones," said Harriet Hurt, Class of '65.

    Ami Watson, Class of '61, recalls meeting Jones some years after graduating.