.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Senate inquiry targets televangelists

    For many, many years Americans who hold dear their religious beliefs have been subjected to various and sundry appeals from television evangelists. Usually, it?s for money, and - given the rise of the religious right - it?s lately been for political support for some cause or candidate.

    It?s true that laws regarding the tax exempt status of churches prevent preachers from directly telling their subjects to vote for a certain candidate. But in recent years, ?Voter Guides,? produced by the Christian Coalition, have done the job just as effectively.

  • We'll get what we voted for

    Last week I read that students in Venezuela are carrying out campus protests against Hugo Chvez' effort to change the country's constitution.

  • Drivers on the roads need to take note and move over or slow down

    The holiday weekend means more travelers on Virginia roads, more travelers mean more vehicles and more vehicles mean the possibility for more accidents.

    With thousands taking to the roads this weekend, and throughout the holiday season, the Virginia State Police have announced a new public awareness campaign to remind Virginians of the importance of the "Move Over" law.

    It's a message worth taking time to consider.

  • Tree lighting will kick off events

    Even as the Thanksgiving turkeys were thawing out to go in the oven, Bedford was being prepared this week for the Christmas season.

    Lights and Christmas decorations went up around the Centertown area and final touches were being made on the light displays at Liberty Lake Park. Those lights are scheduled to be turned on this Friday

    On Saturday, Santa's workshop cruised down Main Street en route to its Centertown Park location, where his North Pole satellite station will be set up through this holiday season.

    Events were also announced for Centertown activities.

  • County takes up slack for museum funding

    Bedford County's Board of Supervisors voted Wednesday night to increase its funding for the Bedford City/County Museum by $20,000.

    The boost, which came from the contingency fund, came after the city of Bedford cut its funding for the museum by $20,000. This leaves the city's funding at $7,500 and boosts the county's funding to $50,000 this year.

  • Health worker gives advice on dealing with MRSA

    Melisa Hobbs was one of a number of parents who came to Staunton High School the morning of Oct. 16.

    Hobbs, however, wasn't there because of fears of MRSA. She came to pick up her daughter to take her for her driver's license test. Hobbs wasn't frightened by the MRSA story because these microbes are a part of her professional specialty. A registered nurse, she's the infection control coordinator at Bedford Memorial Hospital.

    "Staphylococcus Aureus is a normal bacteria on most people's skin and nose," she said. " We carry it around with us."

  • Susie Gibson reunion

    Last week, Bedford Mayor Skip Tharp signed a proclamation honoring the sixth all-class reunion of Susie G. Gibson High School.

    Now the Bedford Science and Technology Center (BSTC), Susie G. Gibson High School was built in 1954 as the Bedford Area's segregated black high school. It graduated its first class in 1955 and its last in 1970. It produced a total of 852 graduates during its 16 years.

    "We always give credit to our only principal, John I. Jones," said Harriet Hurt, Class of '65.

    Ami Watson, Class of '61, recalls meeting Jones some years after graduating.

  • BCEA seeks 5% raise commitment for next three years

    Over the next couple of months, representatives from the Bedford County Education Association hope to make their case for higher salaries for Bedford County teachers.

    What's at stake, the BCEA claims, is the future of education in the county.

    "There are people who are starting to look elsewhere," states Fred Glover, BCEA president, on the salaries being offered by Bedford County in relation to other school districts.

    What the BCEA will be asking for is a commitment from the county for a 5 percent raise for teachers, for each of the next three years.

  • School system trims expenses to cover shortfall, cleanup

    A $1.4 million shortfall in state funds, along with a $216,000 bill for MRSA cleanup, has the Bedford County School administration and School Board looking for ways to cut expenses.

    A report to the School Board earlier this month by School Director of Finance Randy Hagler noted that state sales tax revenue is expected to fall some $500,000 short of budget projections while the state revenue based on average daily membership is down some $900,000.

  • KBBC presents awards

    The Keep Bedford Beautiful Commission (KBBC), at an awards dinner this month, honored individuals and organizations that have performed noteworthy accomplishments to improve the city's appearance.

    The Volunteerism Award went to the Shepherd's Table. Although this organization's work doesn't affect the city's appearance, its volunteers make a difference for many people in the community. They serve 100 meals a day, aiming to help people in tight circumstances.