Today's News

  • Reynolds’ legacy lives on at Peoples

        Mike Reynolds first opened the doors of Peoples Furniture on the first business day in January, 1935 — in the depth of the Great Depression. Businesses had failed all over the place, but Peoples thrived.

        The business is still in the Reynolds family. Brian Reynolds, Mike’s grandson, and his wife, Kim, represent the second generation of the Reynolds family to run the store. Brian inherited the store after Mike died in 2012 at the age of 99.

  • New trash carts to be delivered

        About half of the town of Bedford’s residential solid waste customers will be receiving carts for their trash within the next six weeks.

        The town is implementing a new cart system for its solid waste collection in order to help streamline the pickup process. Council approved, in this year’s budget, purchasing 1,100 carts to be handed out to half the customers; it is expected to provide funding for the rest of the town’s customers next year.

  • Attempted murder for hire

    Kevin Christopher Colgan will spend 10 years in prison for trying to hire a hit man to kill his estranged wife.

        The hit man turned out to be an undercover police officer. Colgan pleaded no contest, in March, to the charge of solicitation to commit murder.
        Colgan took the stand during his sentencing hearing Tuesday morning in Bedford County Circuit Court. He said the divorce was hard for him.
        “I never planned to get a divorce,” he said.

  • Body Camp lawsuit dropped

        A lawsuit alleging that racism played a role in the school board’s decision to close Body Camp Elementary School has been dropped.
        “We had to let it go due to financial problems,” said Penny Berger, the Body Camp parent and volunteer who helped organize the lawsuit.
        Berger said the group had been told that it would cost another $20,000, plus $5,000 for depositions, plus court costs, to pursue the lawsuit. They dropped the suit because they didn’t have the money to proceed.

  • Caregiver faces charges

        A 37-year-old Lynchburg woman, working as a caregiver at Carriage Hill, has been charged with malicious wounding and felony abuse of an incapacitated adult causing injury.
        Andrea Nicole Richmond-Smith was arrested Aug. 11, following an investigation of a July 3 incident that occurred with an 82-year-old female patient at Carriage Hill, according to Bedford Police Chief Todd Foreman.

  • Police investigate shooting into car

        Bedford Police are investigating a shooting incident that occurred July 25 in the 600 block of North Street.
        According to Chief Todd Foreman a gun was fired at the back of a vehicle in that area. Police responded to reports of two or three gunshots being fired.
        One person was injured in the vehicle, apparently from a small laceration caused by glass. The bullet was lodged in the seat.

  • The long way home

    His 100-day, 4,300-mile journey on a bicycle across the United States was nearing its end and Greg Baltad was facing a dilemma.

        It was late in the evening on July 31 and he was heading into Vinton – he could find a place to stay there, or peddle the 30 or so miles left to reach Bedford.
        Baltad hit the Blue Ridge Parkway and headed this way.

  • Liberty High School marks half-a-century

        Liberty High School reached the half-century mark this year and its first graduating class, the class of 1965, is holding its 50th reunion next month.
        For members of this class, their senior year was the only year they attended Liberty and one group of them actually wear the class ring of a different high school. The students who came from New London Academy received their class rings during their junior year, and these were New London Academy rings.

  • Display honoring Lacey Putney dedicated

        Former Delegate Lacey Putney prefers not to be called a statesman.

        He often quotes a statement Harry Truman once made about statesmen: “A statesman is a politician who has been dead for at least 15 years.”

  • Drivers warned to obey laws around stopped buses

        School starts on Aug. 17 and big yellow buses will be traveling the streets and roads of Bedford County on their mission to take students to and from school safely.

        The children’s safety not only depends on the bus driver’s skill and judgment, it also depends on people obeying state law when they see a school bus stopped with its red lights flashing and its stop sign extended.