.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Letters

    Defending Socialism

        I am shocked that anyone who grew up in Bedford County or City would publicly defend socialistic ideas in letters to the Bedford Bulletin.  If the government owns the healthcare system it is Socialism.  If it does not own the healthcare system but controls the healthcare system it is Fascism [Nazism] by definition.  Obamacare is Socialism calling itself Universal Healthcare.  Just what part of Socialism do the defenders of Socialism not understand? 

  • Speakers at 5th District townhall meetings showed respect

    It’s been quite an August. Over the course of the month, I’ve had the privilege of holding 21 town hall meetings throughout the 5th District – more than any other Member of Congress in the country. In total, nearly 5,000 people participated and the average length of each meeting was three hours. The topic of healthcare was definitely the number one concern, although people also brought up education, jobs, the federal deficit, and our nation’s energy policy.

  • Putting an end to the bailout culture in Washington
  • The Kennedys made America better, period

        The death of Senator Edward Kennedy, however not unexpected, has nonetheless left many of us with the familiar feeling that all our best heroes are dead or dying.

        As one friend of mine put it when we were discussing his death last week, it seems that all of our lives we’ve been burying Kennedys. It’s been possible to feel, sometimes, that with each death we’ve lost a lot of our hopes for the country and the world. But that’s not what any of the Kennedy brothers would have wanted.

  • Condolences may be in order

        Normal people like sports. I, on the other hand, like politics and that makes Virginia a great place to live. We have elections every year!

        This is because Virginia does not hold state and local elections in the same year that federal elections take place. Virginia’s elections follow a cycle that puts them in odd numbered years. This year, Virginia voters will elect a governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general. Virginia governors cannot succeed themselves, so we always get a new governor every four years.

  • Turning 102

    Virginia Robertson has always worked hard and though she turned 102 years old this past Sunday she’s not yet ready to slow down.

        “I do everything I want to do,” Virginia said this week about remaining active. “I worked hard all my life — from the time I was knee-high to a duck.”

  • New home makes room for more books

        Going from North Bridge to South Bridge Street isn’t a big move, geographically, but it made a big difference for the owners of Bella Books.

        Gary Guida and Kim Cashman had been operating a used book and antique shop for a year in a location that they shared with another business. Moving to a spot next to the Bedford Social Club, across the street from Still Waters Cafe, has tripled their space.

        “It looks more like a proper book store,” Guida said.

  • When making spending decisions, governments must now set aside rosy projections

    Virginia is now facing a fourth round of cuts to the state general fund budget in a year. This time the cuts are being estimated at $1.5 billion. It shouldn’t have been that much.

  • Letters

    Public option

        It appears that President Obama and other Democrats may be backing away from the public option health insurance proposal. Hopefully, that is an indication that they are beginning to listen to the citizens opposing this proposal in the town hall meetings and other forums.  This is much more productive than calling those citizens “mobs,” “unruly,” “stooges” and “un-American.”

  • Our rural communities could gain a lot from health care reform

    As I continue visiting every county in the 5th District throughout the August recess, I continue to get feedback and questions from constituents about health care reform. Specifically, our neighbors want to know how health insurance reform will help rural America. Our rural areas have almost five percent higher uninsured rate than urban areas, and the current recession means more people are losing access to their employer-based health coverage.