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Today's News

  • Friday morning fire guts house

    A Friday morning fire gutted a house on U. S. 460 a few miles west of Bedford.

    Russell Stevens, Bedford's fire chief, said the call came in around 7 a.m. Flames were shooting out of the front of the house when firefighters got there.

    Stevens, who was the on-scene commander for the firefighters involved, said that it took between 35 and 40 minutes to extinguish the blaze. However, smoldering pockets inside walls and in the attic kept them on the scene until nearly noon.

    The house was heavily damaged.

  • Answering God's call

    Charles Moore can tell you that getting carjacked is a disconcerting experience. It's even worse when the thieves take you along with the car.

    This was one of many experiences that Moore had during nearly 30 years as an American Baptist missionary in Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

  • Man arrested after standoff

    At 7:28 a.m. Thursday morning, Bedford County Sheriff?s Office received a 911 call reporting that a woman had been abducted and stabbed in the stomach. The Chamblissburg Rescue Squad and sheriff?s deputies responded to 116 Scenic Drive. The female victim, was able to get away from the suspect and go to a neighbor?s home and call 911. She had a stab wound to her side and was transported to Carillon Roanoke Memorial Hospital. At this time the relationship between victim and suspect is unclear.

  • Guest commentary: Irritable bowl syndrome

    For college football fans, this should be a most exciting time of year. We have sacrificed weekends (and some Thursday nights), cheered, screamed, cried and overindulged in greasy hot wings for this. That is right - it is Bowl time.

    This is a magical time of year where, for almost three weeks, we have games to watch every day. However, just as we sometimes have too much of the Christmas goose or the holiday eggnog, it might be that we have too much of a good thing in the area of bowl games.

    Perhaps we've reached the tipping point in our football merriment.

  • Commentary: The flight of the Golden Eagles

    When I first heard of Staunton River's proposed move to the Blue Ridge, from the Seminole, I didn't like it. It splits our county schools into two districts. We run the risk of having seasons in which county schools don't play one another. On the personal side, it makes it more difficult to track and cover the numerous sports, not just at Staunton River, but at all three county schools.

    But, after I take my selfish reasons out of the mix, I start to warm up to the idea a bit.

    Last week's announcement included some of the rationale for the potential move.

  • Carriage Hill celebrates two decades of service

    Carriage Hill marked 20 years in business this year.

    It came into being when Al Persinger, Tommy Reynolds and Don Rowe decided, back in the '80s, that there was a need for a modern assisted living facility in the Bedford area.

    " Most of the people were going to Lynchburg and Roanoke at that time," recalled Persinger.

    "We knew people around town that needed places to put family members," Reynolds added.

    Along with seeing a need, the three men knew each other well. They had worked together on other business ventures prior to this effort.

  • Bedford County girls' basketball roundup

    It's a good thing Santa grades you on how nice you've been rather than on how you play your county rivals. If the jolly elf used that as his measuring criterion, the Minettes and Lady Eagles would have wakened to coal-filled stockings this past Christmas morning.

    In a sloppily played game, Staunton River prevailed 36-19. Any Seminole rivals that scouted the game would have come away feeling full of confidence in upcoming games with either of these squads.

  • Liberty roundballers prime for Brookville

    Liberty shrugged history aside and topped Heritage by the score of 56-54. Probably more satisfying than breaking the six-year stranglehold that the Pioneers had over the Minutemen was the heart the team showed in the contest.

    "The kids played well down the stretch," said Head Coach Jeff Monroe. "They battled to the end."

    That battling spirit and focus has been in short supply this season, as the Minutemen have lost focus and allowed games to slip through their fingers.

  • River 'rasslers rumble

    Staunton River played the role of rude holiday host, smacking down all who had come over the river and through the woods to the River Rumble wrestling tournament.

    Seemingly every Golden Eagle came to wrestle as Staunton River swept its bracket with wins over Radford (66-12), James River (67-12) and E.C. Glass (50-27). That sweep put the Eagles into the championship round against Hidden Valley, which Staunton River dispatched by a score of 57-24.

  • Saying goodbye to 2007

    This is the paper's last edition of the year, and in a few days we will march uncertainly, but hopefully, into 2008. Some reflections on the year almost past would seem to be in order.

    • First, I'd like to offer some thanks to the Bulletin itself. One, for continuing to allow me the privilege of writing this column. Two, for the October publication of "Bedford's Journey: Then and Now." This historical supplement was very well done, and is a tribute to everyone who worked on it.