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Today's News

  • Five arrested in string of arrests

        Authorities have arrested five people in connection with a string of thefts in the Stewartsville and Moneta areas.
        On Monday July 24, Bedford County Sheriff’s Office investigators obtained arrest warrants for three men and two women. The warrants were the result of the ongoing investigation of thefts that occurred between the middle of June and middle of July.
        According to Major Ricky Gardner, the thefts included a string of larcenies involving equipment, lawnmowers and trailers in that area.

  • Council considers new position

        Bedford Town Council was expected to decide Tuesday whether to proceed with establishing the position of an economic development coordinator, who might possibly also do contract work for Bedford Main Street, Inc.
        At a meeting earlier this month, council discussed the position. Funding for the position would be provided within the general fund from projected savings in compensation line items for positions that will not be filled during the current fiscal year. 

  • Goodview man faces charges in connection with shooting of dog

        A Goodview man who allegedly shot a neighbor’s dog after it had bitten his grandson has been charged with reckless handling of a firearm.
        Last Wednesday, July 19 at 8:20 p.m., Bedford County 911 dispatchers received a call to Oak Park Drive in Goodview. The caller reported that a man had just shot a dog in front of children.

  • Welch requests change of venue

        The double murder case against Lloyd Lee Welch Jr. could be moved from Bedford County if his request for a change of venue is granted.
        Welch’s attorneys filed the request at the end of June, stating that because of pretrial publicity their client could not receive a fair trial in Bedford or surrounding counties.

  • History program makes local connection

        Every year the Bedford Museum holds a history program for elementary school aged children called Fridays at the Museum. Each year, Jennifer Thomson, who heads up the program, chooses a different area of history.

  • Fatal persuit: Goodview man in court

    HILLSVILLE – A Bedford County man facing charges related to the crash that killed a Carroll County deputy has pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors and his two felony charges will go to a grand jury.

        Joseph Alan Lambert, 21, of Goodview, was being pursued by Carroll County authorities on the night of March 9. Deputy Curtis Bartlett was on his way to join the pursuit for Lambert, answering fellow deputies’ calls for help, when his patrol vehicle collided with a tractor-trailer. He died at the scene.

  • Oakes to be new principal at HES

        The Bedford County School Board has appointed Traci Oakes as the new principal of Huddleston Elementary School.
        Announcement of the appointment was made during Thursday’s meeting of the board.
        Oakes most recently served as assistant principal at Goodview Elementary School for the 2016-2017 school year. Prior to that she spent 21 years working for Franklin County Public Schools.

  • Charges against pastor dismissed

        This past spring, the Rev. Joshua Ball, pastor of Grace House before the homeless shelter closed, was charged with writing a bad check to the town’s electric department and assaulting a man. The check was written in a effort to pay the shelter’s electric bill, which was in arrears.
        Last week, Ball had his day in court. The bad     Ball said, in a phone interview, that as far as he knew, the money was there when he wrote the check.

  • Supervisors adopt dock ordinance

        The Bedford County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted, after a joint public hearing with the planning commission, to remove all references to American Electric Power (AEP) from the zoning ordinance’s building permit process for docks at Smith Mountain Lake.

  • AEP believes they have an obligation

        John Shepelwich, a spokesman for American Electric Power, said, in a phone interview, that the company believes that the flowage easements attached to properties that extend below the 800 foot contour at Smith Mountain Lake gives the power company regulatory rights. Shepelwich said the easements were worked out in the 1960s.