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Today's News

  • Shearing day comes to local alpaca farm

        Otter Peaks Alpacas invited three other alpaca farms to join in as the farm brought in a professional shearing team to shear their alpacas.

        John and Cindy Ferrante, who own Otter Peaks, have 22 alpacas.
        Alpacas are domesticated camelids that were bred in the Andes Mountains for very thick, wooly coats. Alpaca wool is warmer than sheep’s wool and is not prickly. It is also hypoallergenic because it does not contain lanolin. Alpaca wool is flame resistant.

  • Getting out from behind their four walls

        David Hinsen, Bedford Church of God’s senior pastor, believes it’s important for the church to “get outside our four walls.”

        “If all we do is have a couple of services and go home, we’ve failed,” he said. “We need to be a part of the community.”
        That’s the impetus behind the church’s decision to open a food pantry on May 1. According to the Rev. Hinsen, the idea came from J. R. Cook, the youth pastor.

  • Bedford Memorial honored hospital volunteers

        Bedford Memorial Hospital honored its volunteers, Thursday, with an appreciation lunch at the Bedford Columns. Along with a buffet lunch, the event featured entertainment and door prizes donated by 35 area merchants.

  • Restoration fundraiser slated for May 10

    Friends of Big Otter Mill and the 24th Masonic District are teaming up for a fundraiser at Big Otter Mill on Saturday, May 10.

        All profits from the fundraiser, a BBQ dinner, will go to the mill restoration project and Masonic District charitable projects. The mill will be open for tours during the fundraiser, which takes place from 3-7 p.m.
        “We are trying to get it restored,” said Tom Richardson, a member of the mill’s board of directors.

  • D-Day Memorial seating gets a facelift

    Workers from F & S Building Innovations spent Monday installing new surfaces, donated by Trex, a company located in Harrisonburg, to the benches that surround the plaza at the National D-Day Memorial.

        The Trex material looks like stained wooden planks. The workers saw it and use construction screws to secure the planks in place, but it’s not wood. It’s made of recycled plastic bottles. According to Martin Leamy, the D-Day Memorial’s site manager, it’s more weather resistant than pressure treated wood.

  • Husband, wife crime team enter guilty pleas

        Two 19-year-old married teens entered guilty pleas to multiple felony counts in Bedford County Circuit Court Tuesday morning.

        The couple were among 50 people arrested last year following an investigation by the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office.
        Leigha Bragg Hall entered guilty pleas for breaking and entering, grand larceny, credit card theft and credit card fraud.

  • Thaxton man to serve 8 years on child porn charges

        A Thaxton man will spend eight years in prison, following a contested sentencing hearing last week in Bedford County Circuit Court.

        Judge James Updike sentenced David Wayne Seabolt, 58, to 18 years in prison, with 10 years suspended on his10 felony convictions of possessing, 1st count and 10 felony convictions, subsequent offense.

  • Supervisors vote for tax hike

    Taxes are going up.
        The Bedford County Board of Supervisors voted 4-3 Monday night to set the real estate tax rate for the next fiscal year at 52 cents per $100 in assessed value. This is a 2 cent increase over the previous tax rate of 50 cents.
        Although the budget county staff presented was balanced without the tax increase, some supervisors felt it left important issues unaddressed.

  • Celebrating 45 years at Camp Virginia Jaycee!

    Just more than 45 years ago, Bill Robertson had set a plan in motion.

  • School board looks for savings

        In an effort to trim more than $1 million from its budget proposal, the Bedford County School Board voted Thursday to change its health insurance plans for employees.
        And more changes may be on the way.
        Under the current plans offered to employees, the cost of insurance would have jumped by 28 percent in the upcoming 2014-2015 budget, well over $2 million in additional cost. But the school board is looking for savings from its budget request to the county.