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Today's News

  • Staunton River Boys soccer preview

     

    The good news for Staunton River's boys soccer team is that it has ample opportunity to improve.

    The bad news is that it will have to do so in the rugged Blue Ridge District/Conference 31.

    The Eagles won only two contests last season, with none of those victories taking place in district play.

    This year, the team takes to the pitch with a new head coach and a positive attitude, as well as a desire to engage in a high level of physical play.

    But, how will that translate in terms of play?

  • Liberty boys soccer preview

     

    You read it here first:  The Liberty boys soccer team has a reasonable shot to finish in first place this season.

    That statement is predicated on two factors.  First, we're discussing Conference 30, as opposed to the Seminole District.  The conference, created as part of the VHSL's new playoff structure, includes Brookville, Heritage, Rustburg and Tunstall, as well as the Minutemen.  Those are all decent, but not dominant teams.

    Second, Liberty will send some pretty darn good players onto the pitch this year.

  • JF Boys soccer preview

     

    It's time to get working on another streak.

    Last year, the Jefferson Forest boys soccer program saw its  streak of consecutive Seminole District regular-season championships stopped at 21.

    The stopper came in the form of E.C. Glass.  Now the Cavs would like nothing better than to end the Hilltoppers' Seminole title streak at a mere one.

  • President’s healthcare law continues to harm working families

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

    It seems as though every time we turn around,

  • Action for Congress on executive overreach

    Think back to civics class – one of the first lessons you probably learned was about the three branches of the United States government. The Executive, Legislative, and Judicial branches were created as three co-equal branches of our government under the belief that any one branch should not gain too much power. However, it would seem that some of these lessons have been forgotten by this Administration.

     

  • Calls picking up in March

    By Ryan Burnette
    Lieutenant/PIO
    Forest Vol. Fire Department

        February was a slower month than January for Forest VFD with 32 calls for service but March is starting off busy with 13 calls in seven days thus far.

  • The importance of passing a budget

    By Delegate Terry Austin
    19th District

        The General Assembly has one obligation in Richmond each year, to pass a budget.
        This year, the House budget is focused and prioritized, allotting $500 million for K-12 education, $20 million for tuition moderation, nearly $50 million for mental health, and $118 million for our hospitals for our free clinics. Without a budget, each of these areas, as well as transportation, public safety, our emergency responders, and teachers, will lose millions of dollars in the interim.

  • It’s over... Almost

    Senator Steve Newman
    23rd District

        Finally, it is finished…  Well, almost. 
        During the last week of the 2014 General Assembly, the Senate and House acted on the final bills of this session. In all, we considered over 2,500 pieces of legislation.  We also worked hard to reconcile the Commonwealth’s budget, but due to a mandate from the Governor to include an expansion of Obama Care it could not be done in the 60-day session.

  • Ukraine, Crimea not part of our interests

    Conservatives who don’t like President Obama are having a new field day at his expense in the matter of Russia’s moves in Crimea and the greater situation with Ukraine.
        They have chosen to react as though Russian President Vladimir Putin’s actions are a direct result of what he thinks of Obama. Well, you know, everything bad in the world is Obama’s fault, right?
        Isn’t that what passes for logic these days in the “tea party?”

  • Make a decision

    The time for delays is over; it’s time to make a decision.
        Long before the city of Bedford’s decision to revert to a town; long before the county and then city officials sat down to hammer out a voluntary reversion agreement; long before that reversion became effective on July 1 of last year; and long before a meeting Jan. 28 between the county supervisors and the school board on the subject, the need for a new secondary school in the Liberty Zone was a top priority for the county school system.