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Today's News

  • Going to court

        James Youngblood wants Bedford County to honor its word—or pay up.
        But on Monday night, Bedford County’s supervisors voted to deny a warrant claim filed by  Youngblood.
        A tract of land was donated to Bedford County by Al Stroobants in 2002 for a park and the county acquired five acres of land across Youngblood's property to build a road to give access to the park.

  • Perjury charge

    The special grand jury investigating the 1975 disappearance of sisters Sheila and Katherine Lyon met last week and at least one woman has been indicted, according to a story in The Washington Post.
        According to the Post article, 65-year-old Patricia Jean Welch, a Maryland resident, has been indicted for perjury. Patricia Welch is the wife of Richard Allen Welch who authorities named in October as a “person of interest” in the investigation of the abduction of the two girls who were last seen at a Wheaton, Maryland, shopping mall.

  • Planing commission looks at flea markets

        Just what should a flea market be required to provide?
        That was on the mind of Bedford County’s planning commission last week as members wrestled with rules that govern flea markets.
        This discussion was a result of a question by Gregg Zody, the county’s new director of community development, asking why special use permits are required for flea markets in commercially zoned areas. Zody feels they should be a use-by-right in these zones.

  • Claim, lawsuit filed

        James Youngblood has filed both a claim with Bedford County and a complaint in Bedford County Circuit Court concerning what he alleges is a promise by Bedford County to build a state maintained road across a 257 acre tract he owns.

  • Shooting details revealed

        The officer-related shooting death of Richard Thomas Bergeron on Oct. 28 has been ruled as a justified shooting by Michael R. Doucette, the commonwealth’s attorney in Lynchburg, who was serving as special prosecutor in the investigation.

  • One year later, couple sees new home rise from the ashes

    Jamie and Kim Snell, along with their three shih tzus, Mocha, Java and Latte, were able to move into their new home on Longwood Avenue the week before Thanksgiving.

  • Shooting ruled justifiable; officers return to duty

    The officer-related shooting death of Richard Thomas Bergeron on Oct. 28 has been ruled as a justified shooting by Michael R. Doucette, the commonwealth's attorney in Lynchburg, who was serving as special prosecutor in the investigation.

    “I will not be seeking any criminal charges against them,” Doucette wrote in a letter to Circuit Court Judge James Updike. “In fact, in my opinion, they should be commended for the quick and decisive action they took which saved the life of Doris Bergeron.”

  • Investor reacts to charges

        Charlie Frazer describes himself as a minor investor, but still just feels “that he’s been had.”

  • Cavalier Theatre among the state’s best

        Jefferson Forest High School’s (JFHS) Cavalier Theatre went to Charlottesville, Monday, for the state championship competition in theater.

  • King shares his thoughts on the election

        Walt King could not be reached in time for his thoughts on the Nov. 4 Town Council election to be included in the Bulletin’s post election story. King got 597 votes, not enough to win a seat on council.
        He later connected with the Bulletin through an email.
         “I had wondered after elections how the people  that do not get elected feel; some spending years and millions of dollars,” King stated.