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Today's News

  • Don’t fear a U.S. Ebola epidemic

    Generally speaking, mainstream media coverage of the Ebola crisis – as it relates to the U.S. – has been about as bad as it could get.
        Television coverage, in particular, has done nothing but stir up fear and paranoia, and some people don’t need much encouragement to lapse into either one.
        When one of the infected Dallas nurses was being transported to a hospital, and was even then listed in fair condition, CNN and MSNBC sent out helicopters to cover the “motorcade.”

  • The Republican Party is a political party

  • Harvey to speak at Memorial's Veterans Day program

        John C. Harvey, Jr., a retired U.S. Navy Admiral, who is now the Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs for the Commonwealth will be the keynote speaker for the National D-Day Memorial’s annual Veterans Day program on November 11. 
        Attendees will have the opportunity to hear from Admiral Harvey who will speak at the National D-Day Memorial on November 11 at 11 a.m. during a special ceremony honoring veterans for their service.  The event is open to the public.

  • Lord, it was close

     

    By Jeffery McClintock

    Special to the Bedford Bulletin

     

    On a cold and rain-drenched Friday night Staunton River met Blue Ridge District foe Lord Botetourt in Daleville. Those hardy enough to withstand the condition witnessed what Botetourt Head Coach Jamie Harless told the Eagles was, “…one helluva game.”

  • Still perfect

     

    Midway through the first quarter, the Jefferson Forest offense had gained a total of 33 yards.

    Yet, the Cavs held a 21-point lead over E.C. Glass.

    That was but one oddity during an appropriately-themed Halloween night game, won by JF, 55-14.

    The three touchdowns were fueled by three events not directly related to the JF offensive unit.

    -After a three-and-out to open the game, Glass muffed a punt attempt.  JF took over on the 11 yard line and scored two plays later on a Jason Ayers QB sneak.

  • Minutemen roll; top Amherst

     

    They're certainly not going to impress you with the size of their roster.

    Therefore, they have to do it with the size of their hearts.

    Liberty's football crew picked up another victory, over Seminole foe Amherst, tending to business on the Lancers' turf, 37-20.

    The team with the incredible shrinking roster turned up the heat in the second half to run away from the speedy Amherstians.

  • Game of the century

     

    We're calling it "The Game of the Century."

    And, by "century," we don't mean the 14 years that have ticked off since we added a "2" to the front of our years.

    We mean the one hundred years, running from 1914 to this year.

    When Jefferson Forest visits the Liberty gridiron this year, it will be the biggest in-county matchup since, well, since forever.

    At least on the football field.

    And, since football is king in these parts, our logic is pretty sound here.

  • Sports commentary: Don't panic

     

    Please, folks.  Can we all take a breath?  This is not the end of days.

    Of course, I speak to the panic which seems to have gripped anyone who is a fan of teams such as Notre Dame, Ohio State and Alabama.

    These are among the teams which are on the bubble of the inaugural NCAA football playoff slate.

  • We must restore common sense to Washington

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

    As I travel around Virginia’s Fifth District, I constantly hear from constituents who are astounded and upset by the manner in which the federal government operates at times.  They are often irritated by the misuse of taxpayer funds and the poor management of federal agencies.

     

  • A common sense response to Ebola in America

    If you had never heard of Ebola before, chances are that you have now. Ebola, a serious and often fatal virus, has made its way to the United States; but that’s not a reason to panic. Ebola has been present in Africa since the 1970’s, and can only be transmitted through direct contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person. The current outbreak in West Africa has severely affected the countries of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, but it is important to remember that these countries have much weaker health care and sanitation systems than those in the United States.