.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • A wild month for wild fires

        March is normally not a particularly bad month for wildfires, according to Bedford Fire Chief Brad Creasy, but this March has been different. Low humidity and strong winds on warm days created good conditions for fire.

        “We’ve been staying busy,” commented Creasy.

  • School days to be extended in BCPS

        After missing in excess of 11 days due to inclement weather this year, students in Bedford County Public Schools will be spending a little more time each day in class to make up for the lost time.

        On Thursday, the Bedford County School Board voted to extend the school day by 10 minutes March 31 through the end of the school year. In addition, the board gave school officials the option to extend that time even longer if needed to make up for more lost time.

  • More coyotes taken this year

        Bedford County’s coyote lottery grew this year.
        The 97 coyotes taken represent a slight increase over last year in spite of winter weather that created poor conditions for trapping and hunting. The number of sponsors providing prize money also grew, providing enough money to create two additional prizes.

  • New Rec Association feels growing pains

        For all of the benefits expected to arrive with the reversion of Bedford into a town, some negative aspects have come to fruition, as well.
        As part of the reversion agreement, what was formerly the City Parks and Recreation Department was to have fallen under the auspices of the Bedford County Parks and Recreation Department.

  • Eyes of Freedom

        A truck, called the Eyes of Freedom Truck, made a stop at the National D-Day Memorial, Friday. This truck commemorates a unit’s loss in the Iraq War — a Marine Reserve company that lost 26 men in 2005 in fighting in Al Anbar province — the type of loss in which Bedford can surely empathize.

  • School system seeks $3.87M more from supervisors

        After narrowly passing a $108 million budget on a 4-3 vote last Thursday, the Bedford County School Board had a chance Monday to try and sell that budget to the county supervisors during a work session attended by both boards.
        The school budget presented to the supervisors included a request for an additional $3.87 million in funding from the county, for a total local expenditure of $42.9 million.

  • County may raise taxes

        The budget Bedford County’s supervisors are developing may include a real estate tax increase.
        During a Monday night work session, Deputy County Administrator Frank Rogers described two measures that will close the $141,000 gap remaining in the county’s budget. One comes from savings on medical insurance.

  • Taking a stand against bullying

    Bedford Town Councilman Robert Carson is concerned about bullying and has started a campaign to draw attention to the problem and get people talking about it. He’s begun by distributing buttons that read “I take a stand against bullying!”

        “Most of the buttons of my first order have gone,” he said. Some have gone as far as Tennessee.
        Bullying can take multiple forms. It can be physical, but it can also be verbal. Carson notes that it’s possible to destroy another person with your words.

  • Agriculture conference draws large crowd

        The weather was perfect for the agricultural conference that Bedford County’s ag board sponsored Saturday and Central Virginia Community College’s Bedford facility.

        It was a mild sunny day, but farm fields were still muddy, so local farmers turned out for the conference. Jeff Powers, chairman of the ag board, estimated the turnout at about 100 people. This count does not include what may be the world’s friendliest dog, who came over from a neighboring house to greet people.

  • CASAs help children caught up in court system

        According to Juvenile and Domestic Relations Judge Louis Harrison, CASA is a valuable asset in the cases he hears.

        CASA stands for Court Appointed Special Advocate. These trained volunteers are appointed by the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court to investigate and advocate for children in cases before the court where children are involved. They prepare a report, making a recommendation on what is best for the children, to help the judge make his decision.