.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Shuperb performance

     

    Welcome to the world of 4A track.

    Jefferson Forest found out first-hand just how competitive is its new region, 4A-North.  The Cav crew saw some blistering performances.

    And turned in some of their own.

    While the guys were somewhat held in check, the Lady Cavs posted some impressive runs.  In particular, Alyssa Shupe stood out for the Runnin' Cavs.

  • There's no keeping up with these Joneses

     

    On the face of it, they have little in common, other than the same last name.

    One wears Liberty's red, white and blue.

    The other dons Staunton River's black and gold.

    One is a standout basketball player.  The other excels in volleyball.

    One is a junior, the other in her final year of high school.

    One is black-haired.  The other has light brown tresses.

    But Liberty's Mikalah Jones and Staunton River's Taylor Jones do, in fact, have a lot in common.

  • Call him "Yes"-akowski

     

    The team leader earned some individual glory.

    Jefferson Forest's Blake Nowakowski, who has been a driver for the Cavs during his four years of swimming, took top honors at last weekend's State swim meet.

    During an interview back in December, Nowakowski told us, "I'm really excited (about the season).  I hope to leave some lasting impression."  

    Did he ever.

  • Seay what?

     

    For such a small group, it sure delivered.

    Bedford County sent a total of six wrestlers to the State championship tourneys at Salem last weekend.

    The group acquitted itself quite nicely; none more so than Staunton River's Elijah Seay.  The sophomore sensation took second place in his second trip to the big show.

    Seay wrestled himself into the 3A finals at 182 points with a pair of workmanlike wins in Salem.  Unfortunately, he faced Poquoson's Ross Graham, who owned a season record of 42-0 at that point.

  • Sports commentary: Are districts still needed?

     

    Bad laws rarely get repealed.

    Right now, we're living with the results of a law that many find confusing and counterproductive.

    Implemented with the most noble of intentions and after months and months of painstaking and dedicated work, the law is meeting resistance on many fronts.

    It has been widely bashed in the press for an awkward implementation and for providing unforeseen side effects.

    The law of which I write, of course, is the Virginia High School League's realignment.

  • Bedford Weaving drops lawsuit against Water Authority

    The lawsuit filed against the Bedford Regional Water Authority is now in the process of being dropped.  On Friday, February 21 Bedford Weaving filed a motion for a non-suit at the Bedford County Circuit Court.

  • Honoring the sacrifices of our nation’s veterans

    By Congressman Robert Hurt

     

  • Honoring the sacrifices of America’s heroes

    The soldiers who stormed the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, saw some of the most intense fighting of World War II.  Among them on D-Day was Sergeant Robert L. Sales of Madison Heights, a member of the Virginia National Guard Company B, 116th Infantry.   After coming under fierce attack in the first wave of the invasion, Mr. Sales made his way to the seawall.  He was the only man from his landing craft to survive the landing and went on to continue fighting on the front lines.

  • Differing budget plans could lead to lengthy session

    Senator Steve Newman
    23rd District

        On Feb-ruary 11, “Crossover,” all Senate bills crossed over to the House of Delegates and vice versa, just in time for a snow storm to blow through Richmond. As temperatures hovered around freezing outside, inside the Capitol the full Senate reviewed many of the most controversial bills of this Session.

  • Crossover week

        Any optimism that winter might be winding down was dashed this week, as Richmond got socked with two days of snow.  The inclement weather was sufficient to keep many of the General Assembly Building’s usual inhabitants at home.  With very few exceptions though, legislators were in their seats for session every day.