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Today's News

  • Carriage Hill undergoes changes

        Carriage Hill is now under new management.

        T. J. M. Properties, of Clearwater, Fla., purchased the retirement community last year. According to Chris Davis, Carriage Hill’s executive director, T. J. M. specializes in assisted living, skilled care and independent living facilities. He said that facilities like Carriage Hill are the heart of what the company does. It currently has 11 facilities and acquiring Carriage Hill was the beginning of an expansion into Virginia. He anticipates having two more by the end of the year.

  • Taking the reins at BMH

    Bedford Memorial Hospital’s new CEO is a familiar face. Patti Jurkus, who took the helm on Feb. 1, first came to Bedford Memorial in December, 1988.

        “I started in human resources,” she said.

        During her time at the hospital, she went back to school and earned her bachelor of science degree in management and development from Bluefield College. Then, she earned her MBA from Liberty University.

  • Council hears budget requests

    Representatives from several local organizations made their pitch to Bedford City Council last Tuesday asking that funding for them be included in the city’s upcoming budget.

        Dan Plattus, office manager of Bedford Main Street, listed numerous changes that the organization has undergone since last year, including a new Web site, a new brand for Centertown — the Bedford Art and Antique District — a new event (2nd Fridays) and a more coordinated effort of downtown merchants working together.

  • State budget still cuts education, health care, public safety

    RICHMOND – After much deliberation, the General Assembly has passed a two-year $82 billion budget that cuts spending on education, health care and public safety to bridge a $4 billion shortfall.

        But the cuts aren’t expected to hit the local school budget as much as originally anticipated.

        “Many previous unimaginable cuts would be necessary to produce a balanced budget,” said Sen. Mary Margaret Whipple of Arlington, who chairs the Virginia Senate Democratic Caucus.

  • Stalin bust controversy reaches into Poland

    The National D-Day Memorial Foundation’s decision to include a bust of Joseph Stalin in its sculpture program has drawn international attention.

  • The census matters

    The 2010 Census questionnaire will arrive at households throughout Virginia from March 15 through 17.  Census Bureau officials ask you to watch for the 10-question form, fill it out and mail it back immediately in the provided, postage-paid envelope. Doing this will save time and money. 

  • Letters

    Interesting take

        Last week’s article and Letters to the editor regarding Bedford County’s school budget were interesting.

        A few years back, the company I work for was near bankruptcy and the employees were asked to take reduced pay and fewer paid holidays instead of more layoffs. We agreed to this because we understood that every remaining employee was necessary for the continued operation of the company. The company survives, I still have a job and continue to pay my county taxes.

  • The cheapest energy is the energy you don’t use in the first place

    One of the top concerns I hear from working families in Central and Southern Virginia is that the cost of electricity is too high. Especially throughout this tough winter, folks are dealing with brutal energy bills because Virginia state law allows power companies to hike rates before they are approved by the State Corporation Commission. While I do not have jurisdiction over the state, I am working on the federal level to bring down the cost of electricity, particularly for rural households.

  • Balancing the federal budget

    It is no secret that the American people are facing a very tough economic climate. Families and small businesses are cutting back on expenses.  As economic uncertainty continues, many across our nation are looking to the government for leadership during this difficult time.  In these challenging economic times it is even more important for government to control spending.

  • Budget has bipartisan support

    The General Assembly completed its business and adjourned its regular session for 2010 just before 6:00 p.m. on March 14.  The final days were dominated by completion of the largest single piece of legislation, the state’s 2010-2012 Biennial Budget.  That budget will set Virginia apart from a lot of other states, as it was balanced without raising taxes.