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Today's News

  • Renovation nearly finished

        The renovation of the Bower Center should be done by late May or early June, according to Sara Braaten, the Center’s director.

  • Child’s illness leads to fight for funding

        Jake Russell was 3 years old when he started having pain in his leg.

        His parents initially thought he might have injured his leg in a fall so they took  him to the doctor. An initial exam revealed Jake didn’t have an infection and that there wasn’t any break.
        More tests were run and soon they realized the diagnosis was much worse.
        Jake had cancer – specifically Ewing’s sarcoma.

  • Requests exceed available money

        Bedford County’s supervisors are, once again, faced with more budget requests than they have money to pay for. 
        Susan Crawford, the county’s director of fiscal management, presented the supervisors with the budget that had requests that exceed current revenue highlighted in gray. For example, the Sheriff’s Office has requested 17 new vehicles. Seven of these were in the gray section. Each vehicle, fully equipped, will cost an average of $48,000.

  • Board to begin discussion of budget proposal

        Dr. Douglas Schuch presented the school board with a proposed budget of $101,282,991 for the next school year Thursday night. That’s $3,401,855 less than last year’s budget.
        But the school board will actually seek more local funding.
        How did that happen?

  • Norovirus outbreak closes Montvale Elementary for one day

        An outbreak of norovirus at Montvale Elementary led to a decision to close the school last Friday to prevent further spread of the virus and to allow for a thorough cleansing of the school building.
        The action appears to have worked. After having close to half of the school absent on Thursday, only 27 students were out of school on Monday.

  • Local projects receive tourism grant funds

        Two local events were among those that received matching fund grants announced this week by Governor Terry McAuliffe.
        In all, $812,000 in matching grant funds will be awarded to 39 local tourism initiatives as part of Virginia Tourism Corporation’s (VTC) Marketing Leverage Program. The grants are designed to help local and regional tourism entities attract more visitors by leveraging local marketing dollars and will ultimately impact at least 153 other statewide tourism entities.

  • A champion

        Last Tuesday Bedford Town Council voted to save some money and learned the town had a state champion mulberry.

        During citizens comments, Sandra Boyes told Council that Bedford has the Virginia state champion red mulberry tree at 528 South Street, in the side yard of the J. F. Wingfield House. The tree is 100 years old and is the survivor from a number of mulberry trees that were planted in Bedford as part of an effort to start a domestic silk industry.

  • Vinton man guilty of abduction, malicious wounding

        Three months after abducting a Bedford County woman the first time, Willard Wayne Hale abducted the same woman again, causing numerous injuries to his victim.

  • Super Tuesday

        Bedford area residents went to the polls Tuesday to do their part to help select Republican and Democratic nominees for November’s presidential election.

        County voters could vote in only one of the primaries; they had to select either the GOP or Democratic ballot prior to voting.
        The Virginia primaries were part of the much larger Super Tuesday voting involving 12 states in which about half of the delegates to each convention will be up for grabs.

  • Four generations at mill

        Larry Minnis and his son, Kevin, represent third and fourth generations of their family to work at the paper mill in Big Island.

        The first generation was Jessie Minnis, Larry’s grandfather. The second was Larry’s father, Marshall, who started in 1939. Larry’s uncle, J. W. Reynolds was the mill’s first black supervisor.
        Kevin noted that his maternal great-grandfather, Gilbert Spinner, also worked at the mill.