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Today's News

  • 5th District GOP to hold primary

    Republicans will decide who will get their nod to challenge Congressman Tom Perriello for the 5th Congressional District seat next year.

        The decision was made at a meeting of the 5th District Republican Committee, Saturday. According to Tucker Watkins, chairman of the District’s Republican Party, a primary was approved by a 19-13 margin.

        Watkins said that those who favored a convention and those who wanted a primary all made strong arguments in support of their positions.

  • Ground Shakaz

    Mickey Johnson’s team at the Mobile Electronics Competition Association’s world competition, held in Nashville, Tenn., was appropriately named “Ground Shakaz.”

  • Thaxton man will serve four years as result of accident that killed Roanoke man

    By all accounts the events of Aug. 22, 2008, that led up to the sentencing of  Matthew Ivan Sayers in Bedford County Circuit Court last Friday were tragic.

        The crowded courtroom testified to that.

        On one side of the courtroom sat four rows of the family and friends of 44-year-old Hilton Reaves Holdren III, who was killed when his motorcycle was struck by a Nissan pickup truck driven by Sayers on that Friday evening in late August more than a year ago. Their presence spoke highly of Holdren, who was known for helping others.

  • School board considers more stringent class schedule for seniors

    A proposal that high school seniors in Bedford County Public Schools take at least five classes drew a considerable amount of discussion and no consensus among Bedford County School Board members at Thursday night’s meeting.

        The discussion took place during the presentation of a draft copy of the high school program of studies for next year. Several changes were put in that proposal, including “an expectation that seniors take at least five classes unless special permission by the principal is granted.”

  • Capturing the wind

    A local businessman believes Bedford County needs a wind ordinance.

        Roger Henderson, who owns a woodworking business in Bedford County, spoke before the supervisors at a work session, Monday night, asking them to request that the county’s planning department develop one. Although the planning department is incorporating wind ordinance language in a rewrite of the county’s zoning ordinance, Henderson feels that this is unnecessarily delaying it by making the ordinance part of a much larger project.

  • Just STOPP it

    It’s always nice when Republicans and Democrats can come together to pursue legislation that really benefits local citizens. Such is the case with the  Strengthening the Ownership of Private Property (STOPP) Act.

  • Letters

    Sustainability

        There is an organization once called, International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives, now called Local Governments for Sustainability, ICLEI. They are paid dues with public money in several places in Virginia. In fact, Roanoke is on their listing. As a Bedford resident I would like to know if ICLEI has offered to help Bedford to have sustainability over unsustainability items?

  • Both parties let the Washington-Wall Street alliance control House bill

    Last week, I held a conference call with Chambers of Commerce and other business leaders from across the 5th District to gain their ideas on job creation and how to create new competitive advantage in Central and Southern Virginia. Supporting small businesses is one of the best ways we can turn our economy around. Here are some of the ideas and issues they raised:

  • Urging caution on sweeping climate change proposals

    Currently, government officials from around the globe, including President Obama and top U.S. officials, are gathering in Copenhagen, Denmark for the United Nations Climate Change Conference.  These officials are hoping to create a new treaty containing stringent and enforceable requirements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  While specifics of the treaty are still being worked out, there is reason to believe that the treaty will call for dramatic emission reductions that will cause serious economic harm to our already fragile economy. 

  • Judging Obama’s first year

    With 2009 nearly behind us it’s appropriate to critically assess the first year of Barack Obama’s historic presidency.

        It didn’t take long for the promise of his inauguration to give way to the reality of the crushing problems we all knew he’d face. The financial bailouts - controversial and expensive - had actually begun under the previous administration because, once again, it became necessary to save capitalism from itself.